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Debbie Reynolds

Debbie Reynolds

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Tammy And The... Debbie Reynolds and Sandra Dee, two of Hollywood's most adored girls-next-door,... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

How The West... A Classic Movie Adventure - Breathtakingly Reborn via Pioneering Technology - in... more info $20.98was $20.98 Buy Now

Heaven & Earth... Oscar-winner Oliver Stone follows his Vietnam War epics "Platoon" and "Born on... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Three Little... In "Three Little Words" (1950), Fred Astaire and Red Skelton take on the roles... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

These Old... Art imitates life and life imitates art in this made-for-television special that... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Halloweentown... This Disney Channel original movie chronicles the life of a young witch named... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Mary Frances Reynolds Died:
Born: April 1, 1932 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: El Paso, Texas, USA Profession: Cast ... actor dancer singer hotel owner museum operator
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BIOGRAPHY

Entertainer Debbie Reynolds embodied the cheerful bounce and youthful innocence of the post World War II era, buoying the genre's goodnatured hokum with her sincere charm and energy. One of a long line of girls-next-door like Doris Day and June Allyson, Reynolds was never as sultry as Day could be, and was more of a showbiz cheerleader and less of a tomboy than either. In her most successful films like "Tammy and the Bachelor" (1957) and "Singin' in the Rain" (1952), she was often cast as a sincere young adult in the throes of puppy love - never the virgin chased by rogues like Day or the placid housewife like Allyson. Her squeaky clean image came in handy when, in the biggest Hollywood scandal of the 1950s, her then-husband, crooner Eddie Fisher, left her and their two children, Carrie and Todd, for sultry screen goddess, Elizabeth Taylor. Not surprisingly, the public was more than on Reynolds' side as the jilted wife. Once that furor died down, Reynolds was left to reinvent herself. In the late 1960s, when new sexual mores suddenly rendered the docile suburban female image a thing of the past, Reynolds shifted her focus to nightclub and theatrical stages. She was absent from the big screen for decades but settled into a comfortable presence in the American fabric by returning to film in the 1990s with funny mom roles in films like "Mother" (1996) and "In and Out" (1997) and hysterical guest appearances as the over-the-top mother of Grace Adler (Debra Messing) on "Will & Grace" (NBC, 1998-2006). Reynolds brought both self-mocking and nostalgia to these and other well-received comedic outings, using her persona as a perennially perky throwback to mine genuine laughs well into her 70s.

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