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Claude Renoir

Claude Renoir

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Also Known As: Died: September 5, 1993
Born: December 4, 1914 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Paris, FR Profession: director of photography, assistant director, cameraman, second unit photographer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Apprenticed under noted cinematographers Christian Matras and Boris Kaufman and shot or co-shot several films directed by his uncle, Jean Renoir. Renoir did the photography for one of his uncle's cinematic apogees, "Un Partie de Campagne" (1936) and was the camera operator for the tragic, ebullient master text "Le Grande Illusion" (1937). As a cinematographer, Claude Renoir was responsible for the luminous color work of the "The River" (1951), "The Golden Coach" (1953) and "Elena and Her Men" (1955). He also generated the stark black-and-white compositions of Maurice Cloche's "Monsieur Vincent" (1947) and the psychedelic 60s colors of Roger Vadim's "Barbarella" (1967). Renoir has lensed a stunning array of films, including "Le Mystere Picasso" (1956), second unit work on "Cleopatra" (1963) and Bertrand Blier's "Calmos" (1975). After his final DP credit, "The Spy who Loved Me" (1977), Renoir worked as a cameraman on three films, as he, sadly, lost his sight. Son of character actor Pierre Renoir (1885-1952).

Apprenticed under noted cinematographers Christian Matras and Boris Kaufman and shot or co-shot several films directed by his uncle, Jean Renoir. Renoir did the photography for one of his uncle's cinematic apogees, "Un Partie de Campagne" (1936) and was the camera operator for the tragic, ebullient master text "Le Grande Illusion" (1937). As a cinematographer, Claude Renoir was responsible for the luminous color work of the "The River" (1951), "The Golden Coach" (1953) and "Elena and Her Men" (1955). He also generated the stark black-and-white compositions of Maurice Cloche's "Monsieur Vincent" (1947) and the psychedelic 60s colors of Roger Vadim's "Barbarella" (1967). Renoir has lensed a stunning array of films, including "Le Mystere Picasso" (1956), second unit work on "Cleopatra" (1963) and Bertrand Blier's "Calmos" (1975). After his final DP credit, "The Spy who Loved Me" (1977), Renoir worked as a cameraman on three films, as he, sadly, lost his sight. Son of character actor Pierre Renoir (1885-1952).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1934:
Debut as cinematographer on uncle Jean Renoir's "Toni"
1938:
Debut as an assistant director "La Marseillaise"
1942:
Debut as a director, co-directing with Rene Lefevre "Opera-Musette"
1963:
Debut as director of photography for Hollywood production 2nd unit "Cleopatra"
1977:
Final credit as a director of photography, "The Spy Who Loved Me"
1979:
Final feature credit (as camera operator), "La Toubib/The Medic"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Notes

Not to be confused with his producer/uncle Claude Renoir.

Family close complete family listing

grandfather:
Auguste Renoir. Painter.
father:
Pierre Renoir. Actor.
uncle:
Jean Renoir. Director.
uncle:
Claude Renoir. Producer, production manager.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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