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Rob Reiner

Rob Reiner

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Also Known As: Robert Reiner Died:
Born: March 6, 1947 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Bronx, New York, USA Profession: producer, actor, director, executive, screenwriter, songwriter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

een as a violation of his role as chairman. But an audit conducted after his departure confirmed that the state commission did indeed have authority to conduct a public advertising campaign. Reiner was also considered for a short time to be a contender to challenge Arnold Schwarzenegger for the governor's seat in 2006, but he bowed out of contention, citing personal reasons.Returning to directing for the first time in four years, Reiner helmed "Alex & Emma" (2003), a romantic comedy which paired Luke Wilson as a blocked writer with a deadline that could prove fatal, starring opposite sassy stenographer Kate Hudson, who helps him finish his novel before gangsters come to collect on his gambling debts. Allegedly based loosely on a true story involving 19th-century Russian novelist, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the film took a serious critical drubbing, with many suggesting that the director was unable to recreate the light, airy tone of his own earlier romantic comedy efforts. That same year, Reiner once again stepped in front of the cameras as himself for the lame showbiz comedy "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star" (2003), starring David Spade. He next directed Jennifer Aniston in "Rumor Has It" (2005), a...

een as a violation of his role as chairman. But an audit conducted after his departure confirmed that the state commission did indeed have authority to conduct a public advertising campaign. Reiner was also considered for a short time to be a contender to challenge Arnold Schwarzenegger for the governor's seat in 2006, but he bowed out of contention, citing personal reasons.

Returning to directing for the first time in four years, Reiner helmed "Alex & Emma" (2003), a romantic comedy which paired Luke Wilson as a blocked writer with a deadline that could prove fatal, starring opposite sassy stenographer Kate Hudson, who helps him finish his novel before gangsters come to collect on his gambling debts. Allegedly based loosely on a true story involving 19th-century Russian novelist, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, the film took a serious critical drubbing, with many suggesting that the director was unable to recreate the light, airy tone of his own earlier romantic comedy efforts. That same year, Reiner once again stepped in front of the cameras as himself for the lame showbiz comedy "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star" (2003), starring David Spade. He next directed Jennifer Aniston in "Rumor Has It" (2005), a mawkish romantic comedy with an intriguing premise. Aniston starred as a thirtysomething woman engaged to her boyfriend (Mark Ruffalo) who returns home for the wedding of her sister (Mena Suvari), to learn that her sharp-tongued grandmother (Shirley MacLaine) may have been the real-life inspiration for Mrs. Robinson in the film "The Graduate" (1967). Reiner followed with "The Bucket List" (2007), a comedy starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman as two terminally ill men who embark on a road trip to fulfill a list of things to do before they kick the bucket. Though the film received mixed critical reviews, it was an undeniable box-office hit, earning more than $175 million worldwide.

In 2010, Reiner helmed the little-seen period romantic drama "Flipped," and two years later he offered up "The Magic of Belle Isle," a thoughtful drama that was also overlooked, despite featuring Freeman in the lead. Also in 2012, Reiner went back to television, playing Bob Day, the father of Zooey Deschanel's lead character, Jess, on episodes of the hit sitcom "New Girl" (Fox, 2011- ). The next year, he continued his on-camera streak with a small part in Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf of Wall Street," which also included fellow directors Spike Jonze and Jon Favreau in the cast. considered to be the best example of the modern genre. It also contained one of cinema's most memorable scenes, when Ryan's character fakes an orgasm to prove authenticity to Crystal while the two are having lunch in a Manhattan deli. The scene was capped by the classic punchline, "I'll have what she's having," which was dryly delivered by Reiner's own mother, Estelle, who became one of the most famous extras of all time.

Continuing his commercial success, Reiner returned to adapting Stephen King with his take on the horror master's novel, "Misery" (1990), which starred James Caan as a famous writer taken hostage and held captive by an obsessed fan (Kathy Bates) after surviving a serious car accident. Both campy and compelling, the otherwise standard thriller was elevated by Bates' offbeat, but thoroughly evil performance, which earned her an Academy Award for Best Actress. After more acting roles in "Postcards From the Edge" (1990) and "Regarding Henry" (1991), Reiner directed "A Few Good Men" (1992), his first collaboration with writer Aaron Sorkin. A slick, well-acted, but ultimately predictable courtroom thriller, "A Few Good Men" starred Tom Cruise as Daniel Kaffee, a Navy JAG lawyer called to defend two Marines (James Marshall and Wolfgang Bodison) implicated in a murdering a fellow Marine in a hazing ritual gone wrong. Aided by his defense team (Demi Moore and Kevin Pollack), Kaffee butts heads with the prosecutor (Kevin Bacon) and ultimately the base commander, Colonel Nathan Jessup (Jack Nicholson), who is later forced to admit that he indirectly ordered the hazing. Once again, a Reiner film contained a memorable line - this time shouted by Nicholson while on the stand, declaring that Cruise couldn't "handle the truth!" The quote was voted the 29th greatest American film quote of all time by the American Film Institute.

"A Few Good Men" earned an Academy Awards Best Picture nomination that year; the only Oscar nod of Reiner's career up until that time. After appearing onscreen in "Sleepless in Seattle" (1993) and "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994), Reiner directed his one of his worse films, "North" (1994), an offensive children's fantasy about a young boy (Elijah Wood) who divorces his parents (Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Jason Alexander) and g s on a nationwide search for a new pair with the help of an odd man (Bruce Willis) who appears in random guises, including as the Easter Bunny and a Federal Express driver. The awful movie marked the end of one successful filmmaking streak on Reiner's part. So bad was "North" that film critic, Roger Ebert, declared that he " hated this movie as much as any movie we've ever reviewed in the 19 years we've been doing this show," while cohort Gene Siskel was more succinct when he called the movie " first class junk." Both named "North" the worst film of 1994. Reiner recovered his dignity with "The American President" (1995), a Capraesque romantic comedy scripted by Sorkin about a widowed president (Michael Douglas) smitten by a luminous lobbyist (Annette Bening). A smart script and fine acting from both the leads and a stellar supporting cast (Richard Dreyfuss, Michael J. Fox and Martin Sheen) helped propel the film, which was a smart mix of romance, comedy and political intrigue.

Reiner followed up with "Ghosts of Mississippi" (1996), an historical drama based on the true story of the long-delayed conviction of a Southern racist and Klansman (James Woods) for the murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers (James Pickens, Jr.). Whoopi Goldberg delivered an excellent portrayal as Evers' widow, while Woods was even better as the wily, aging murderer Brian De La Beckwith, a performance that earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. Unfortunately, the high-minded movie suffered from Hollywood revisionism and a lack of edge that might have enabled it to be the uplifting hymn to justice to which it had aspired. Though the film was not a financial or critical success, Reiner remained proud that "Ghosts of Mississippi" was used as a teaching tool in classrooms around the nation. Meanwhile, Castle Rock - which enjoyed modest success with Reiner's films - was jointly purchased with New Line Cinema by Turner Broadcasting in 1993 for $650 million, and pointed with pride to the success of "Seinfeld" (NBC, 1989-98), which had emerged from its stable.

As his directorial output slowed during the 1990s, Reiner worked with increasing frequency as an actor. He appeared in small supporting roles in "Mad Dog Time" (1996), "The First Wives Club" (1996) and "Primary Colors" (1998), which he followed with a terrific turn as a villainous network executive in Ron Howard's "EdTV" (1999). Reiner next turned up as himself in Albert Brooks' "The Muse" and then acted for the first time in a picture he directed, portraying Bruce Willis' best friend in "The Story of Us" (1999), a technically proficient romantic comedy that did little to advance the notion that his later directorial efforts had the freshness and unpredictability of his earlier work. Reiner entered into a lengthy hiatus where he worked tirelessly to promote his political ideals, which included a stint as chairman for First 5 California, an early childhood development service that was funded by taxes levied on tobacco products. He held the post from 1999-2006, when he was prompted to resign amidst controversy for his campaign to promote Prop 82, a ballot initiative to fund state-run preschool, which was s

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  LBJ (2016)
2.
3.
5.
  Flipped (2010)
6.
7.
  Rumor Has It... (2005) Director
8.
  Alex & Emma (2003) Director
9.
  Story of Us, The (1999) Director
10.
  Ghosts of Mississippi (1996) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 And So It Goes (2014)
3.
4.
5.
 Everyone's Hero (2006)
6.
7.
 Alex & Emma (2003) Wirschafter
8.
 Majestic, The (2001) Voice Of Studio Executive (Cameo Appearance)
9.
 Story of Us, The (1999) Stan
10.
 Ed TV (1999) Whitaker
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Worked in regional theater and with improvisational comedy troupes
1966:
First appearance in film, "Enter Laughing" directed by father Carl Reiner
1968:
TV writing debut, the ABC special "Romp"
1970:
First major film role in the teen drama "Halls of Anger"
1970:
Reteamed with father for "Where's Poppa?"
1970:
TV acting debut in "The Partridge Family" (ABC)
1971:
Debut as a regular on a TV series, as Michael Stivic (aka 'Meathead') on the ground-breaking sitcom "All in the Family" (CBS); also wrote occasionally; earned Golden Globe (1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977) and Emmy (1972, 1973, 1975) nominations for Best Supporting Actor
1972:
Wrote for the short-lived ABC sitcom "The Super"
1974:
First TV producing and directing credits, in collaboration with Phil Mishkin, on the CBS sitcom pilot "Sonny Boy"
1978:
First TV series as creator and executive producer (in collaboration with Mishkin), the short-lived sitcom "Free Country" (ABC); also wrote and starred as Lithuanian immigrant Joseph Bresner
1978:
Executive produced and wrote (with Mishkin) first TV-movie, "More Than Friends" (ABC); also co-starred opposite Penny Marshall in the romantic comedy based on their own courtship
1980:
Broadway acting debut in his father's play "The Roast"
1984:
First feature film as director and first screenplay credit, "This is Spinal Tap"; also wrote several songs and acted; first feature collaboration with Billy Crystal
1986:
Initial collaboration with producer Andrew Scheinman, "The Sure Thing"
1986:
Helmed the coming-of-age tale "Stand By Me," adapted from a Stephen King novella
1987:
First film as producer, "The Princess Bride"; also directed; initial collaboration with William Goldman who adapted the film from his novel of the same name; Crystal appeared in a cameo
1987:
First feature acting role in ten years, in Danny De Vito's directorial debut "Throw Momma From the Train," co-starring Crystal and De Vito
1987:
Formed Castle Rock Entertainment (named for a fictional Maine town that appears in Stephen King's work) with partners Alan Horn, Glenn Padnick, Scheinman and Martin Shafer
1989:
Scored box office hit with the romantic comedy "When Harry Met Sally..." penned by Nora Ephron and co-starred Crystal
1990:
Acted with father in time-travel comedy "The Spirit of '76," directed by brother Lucas Reiner
1990:
Directed Kathy Bates in her Academy Award winning role, "Misery," an adaptation of a Stephen King novel
1990:
First feature collaboration with Mike Nichols, appearing in "Postcards From the Edge" as a movie producer
1991:
Created (in collaboration with Phil Mishkin) and executive produced the short-lived CBS sitcom "Morton & Hayes"
1991:
Acted in Nichols' "Regarding Henry"
1992:
Helmed the screen adaptation of Aaron Sorkin's Broadway play "A Few Good Men"; film received a Best Picture Oscar nomination
1993:
Castle Rock Entertainment (as well as New Line Cinema) purchased by the Turner Broadcasting System for $650 million
1993:
Played Tom Hanks' friend in Ephron's "Sleepless in Seattle"
1994:
Acted in Woody Allen's "Bullets Over Broadway" and in Ephron's "Mixed Nuts"
1995:
Reteamed with Sorkin, directing the romantic comedy "The American President"
1995:
Played a radio shrink in "Bye, Bye Love"
1996:
Directed the civil rights drama "Ghosts of Mississippi"; co-star James Woods earned a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award nomination
1998:
Acted in the political satire "Primary Colors" directed by Nichols and scripted by Elaine May
1999:
Appointed by California Governor Gray Davis to serve without salary as chairman of the nine-member state Children and Families First Commission
1999:
Made cameo appearance as himself in Albert Brooks' Hollywood comedy "The Muse"
1999:
Honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (October 12); star is located next to his father's
2001:
Voice was used for a small part in "The Majestic"
2003:
Directed and co-wrote the feature "Alex and Emma"; also played the character Wirtschafter
2005:
Stepped in to direct Jennifer Aniston and Kevin Costner in the comedy "Rumor Has It..."; replaced freshman director Ted Griffin who penned the script
2007:
Directed Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman in "The Bucket List" as two terminally ill men who escape from a cancer ward and head off on a road trip with a wish list of tasks to accomplish before they die
2010:
Directed the coming-of-age drama "Flipped," based on Wendelin Van Draanen's novel of the same name
2012:
Reunited with Freeman for "The Magic of Belle Isle"
2012:
Began a recurring role on "New Girl"
2013:
Appeared in Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf of Wall Street"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Beverly Hills High School: Beverly Hills , California -
University of California, Los Angeles: Los Angeles , California -

Notes

Some sources list 1947 as the year of Mr. Reiner's birth.

Frank Capra III had worked as first assistant director on three Reiner films prior to co-producing "Ghosts of Mississippi" (1996) and executive producing "The Story of Us" (1999). He also served as first assistant director on both pictures as well.

Reiner was honored with a Friars Club Celebrity Roast in October 2000.

"As an actor I was always more aware of everybody else onstage, or if I was doing 'All in the Family', I was aware of where all the cameras were, where the other actors were, the audience. I was always more interested in the script and in the structure of the script than I was in my performance. Which is not such a great way to approach your acting job." --Rob Reiner quoted in Los Angeles Times, November 25, 1990

In 1998, Reiner championed a successful California ballot initiative, Proposition 10, which resulted in a 50 cent tax on cigarettes going to early educational programs for children.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Penny Marshall. Actor, director. Born on October 15, 1942; married on April 10, 1971; divorced c. 1980.
companion:
Elizabeth McGovern. Actor. Together in the late 1980s.
wife:
Michelle Singer. Photographer. Married in May 1989; met on the set of "When Harry Met Sally".

Family close complete family listing

father:
Carl Reiner. Actor, writer, director, producer. Born on March 20, 1923; directed Reiner in "Enter Laughing" (1966) and "Where's Poppa?" (1970).
mother:
Estelle Reiner. Actor, entertainer. Had a memorable cameo in the deli scene in "When Harry Met Sally..." (1989).
sister:
Sylvia Reiner.
brother:
Lucas Reiner. Director. Born c. 1960; made directorial debut with "The Spirit of '76" (1990), in which Reiner had a cameo.
step-daughter:
Tracy Reiner. Actor. Daughter of Penny Marshall and Michael Henry; raised by Reiner and adopted his name; has appeared in films directed by mother, Reiner and others.
son:
Nick Reiner. Born on September 14, 1993; mother, Michelle Singer.
daughter:
Romy Reiner. Born on December 27, 1997; mother, Michelle Singer.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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