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Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan

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Dark Victory... Bette Davis' bravura, moving-but-never-morbid performance as Judith Traherne, a... more info $4.99was $19.98 Buy Now

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Ronald Reagan:... Citizen, Soldier, Lawyer, Pitcher, All American. 5 Of The Future President's... more info $49.98was $49.98 Buy Now

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Hellcats Of... Ronald and Nancy Reagan's first and only feature film together!Dramatic World... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: June 5, 2004
Born: February 6, 1911 Cause of Death: pneumonia
Birth Place: Tampico, Illinois, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1920:
Moved to Dixon, Illinois when he was nine (date approximate)
:
Began career as a sportscaster, first for radio station WOC in Davenport, Iowa, and later for WHO in Des Moines, with which WOC merged; announced the baseball games of the Chicago Cubs
1937:
While in California covering baseball's spring training, spotted by a Warner Bros. agent and offered a screen test
1937:
Signed by Warner Bros.; film debut in "Love Is on the Air" playing a radio announcer
1938:
First film with future wife Jane Wyman, "Brother Rat"
1940:
Played George Gipp in "Knute Rockne--All American"
1940:
Portrayed George Armstrong Custer in Michael Curtiz's "Santa Fe Trail"
1940:
Acted with Wyman in three films, "An Angel from Texas", "Brother Rat and a Baby" and "Tugboat Annie Sails Again"
1942:
Delivered what is considered his finest screen performance in "King's Row"
:
Served as a captain in the US Air Force, assigned mainly to the production of training films
1947:
Managed to testify before HUAC without naming names
1947:
Served as president of the Screen Actors Guild
1949:
Delivered sensitive performance in Vincent Sherman's "The Hasty Heart", one of two films that year with Patricia Neal (also "John Loves Mary")
:
Went on half-salary with Warner Bros. (unhappy with his recent box office performance) to make one film a year for the remaining three years of his contract, freeing him to work elsewhere; immediately signed a five-picture deal with Universal
1951:
Played chimpanzee-raising professor in the schlock movie "Bedtime for Bonzo"
1952:
Portrayed major league baseball pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander in "The Winning Team"
1952:
Was one of a group of well-known Democrats who signed a telegram urging Dwight Eisenhower to become their party's candidate for president
:
Desperate for work, briefly tried stand-up comedy in Las Vegas
:
Hosted ABC's "The Orchid Award", a musical variety show which formed a half-hour block with Walter Winchell's news and gossip program
:
Hosted "General Electric Theater" on CBS (also starred in some episodes); as company spokesman visited all 139 GE plants in 38 states, meeting some 250,000 employees
1957:
Acted opposite second wife Nancy Davis in "Hellcats of the Navy"
:
Again served as SAG president
1960:
Despite being a Democrat, supported Richard Nixon for US President
1962:
Registered as a Republican and campaigned for Nixon's unsuccessful bid for the California governorship
1964:
Supported Barry Goldwater for US President and gave a ringing endorsement of free enterprise while attacking Communism in a speech known as "A Time for Choosing", telecast as a half-hour paid political spot which raised almost $1 million dollars for the Republican party in the last week of the campaign and launched him as a national political figure
1964:
Final feature film, "The Killers"; played brutal crime kingpin who slapped Angie Dickinson around; originally filmed for TV but deemed too violent for the small screen
1965:
Published first autobiography, "Where's the Rest of Me?"
:
Hosted syndicated series "Death Valley Days"
:
Left show business for politics
1966:
Elected as governor of California; served two terms
1968:
Entered Republican primary for US Presidency
1969:
In February brought in the California Highway Patrol to break a student strike in Berkeley; after three months of escalating violence culminating in bloody riots, brought back the Highway Patrol, bolstered by the Alameda County sheriff's deputies; finally sent in the National Guard and occupied the city for 17 days
1975:
Income as a private citizen jumped to $800,000 (from his $49,000 salary as governor), mostly from speaking engagements, a syndicated column in 174 newspapers and a taped weekly commentary to more than 200 radio stations
1976:
Challenged incumbent Gerald Ford for the US Presidency during the Republican primary; narrowly lost
1980:
Elected President of the United States
1981:
Survived assassination attempt of March 30, quipping to his surgeons from the operating table, "Please tell me you're all Republicans"
1984:
Re-elected to a second term as US President
1990:
Published second memoir "An American Life"
1994:
In an open letter to the people of the USA in November, disclosed that he was suffering from Alzheimer's disease
2003:
Showtime airs controversial telefilm "The Reagans" after CBS dropped out of the project deciding that it did not present a fair portrayal of the Reagans. Film starred James Brolin and Judy Davis as the Reagans, both were nominated for Golden Globes for their performances.

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