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Jerome Pycha Jr.

Jerome Pycha Jr.

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: Art Director ...
RATE AND COMMENT

COMPLETE FILMOGRAPHY WITH SYNOPSIS

Art Director (feature film)

1.
Riders to the Stars (1954) as Art Director
Early astronauts try to solve the mysteries of space travel by capturing a meteor.
2.
Project Moon Base (1953) as Production Design
In the not-too-distant future of 1970, the United States is considering building bases on the Moon, and send a female colonel and two men to investigate. One of the men turns out to be a foreign spy, and the entire operation--and the future of the free world--is in danger.
3.
Prehistoric Women (1950) as Art Director
Tigri (Laurette Luez, working her way up to Bomba and Bowery Boys films) and her stone-age girl friends hate all men, but realizing they are a necessary evil, capture some for potential (strictly business, no recreation allowed) husbands. Engor (Allan Nixon, working his way down to the Mesa of Lost Women) escapes and, in his travels, discovers fire. This comes in handy later, after he has been recaptured by the women, when he drives off a dragon, or something, with his new discovery. This little feat has the effect of making the women realize their rightful subservient position, and he and Tigri have a primitive (non-catered) wedding, and go off to start a new tribe of fur-wearers.
4.
Cover Up (1949) as Art Director
An insurance investigator smells something wrong when he looks into a small-town suicide.
5.
The Great Dan Patch (1949) as Art Director
6.
Strange Gamble (1948) as Art Director
In the 63rd of the series based on the Clarence E. Mulford character, Hopalong Cassidy (William Boyd) is working on a counterfeiting case for the government and, with his two pals California Carlson (Andy Clyde) and Lucky Jenkins (Rand Brooks), enters a town where they meet Nora Murray (Elaine Riley) and her brother Sid (William Leicester), who have come to claim the "Silver Belle" mine. The brother is killed by the gang led by Ora Mordigan (James Craven), and Cassidy discovers a lost mine where the gang has been holding John Murray (Herbert Rawlinson), Nora's father, a prisoner and forcing him to print the bogus money.
7.
Who Killed Doc Robbin (1948) as Art Director
8.
Let's Live Again (1948) as Art Director
9.
The Girl from Manhattan (1948) as Art Director
10.
Silent Conflict (1948) as Art Director
After receiving money for delivering a large herd, Hoppy, California, and Lucky retire to an inn for the night. The next morning both Lucky and the money are gone. At first Hoppy suspects Blaney and his gang but later realizes Doc Richards is responsible. He and his mysterious concoctions have put Lucky under a spell and Hoppy and California set out to find him.
11.
Texas, Brooklyn & Heaven (1948) as Art Director
12.
The Dead Don't Dream (1948) as Art Director
Hoppy, California, and Lucky arrive at an inn for Lucky's wedding only to find it called off as Lucky's fiancee's uncle is missing. He is found murdered and on each of the next two nights a man is found missing the next morning. All three stayed in the same room and Hoppy has lots of suspects. That night he announces the murderer is right here among them and then takes that same room for the night hoping to flush out the murderer.
13.
Borrowed Trouble (1948) as Art Director
Finishing a trail drive, Hoppy and the boys head to town and immediately get caught up in the conflict between school teacher Miss Abott and next door saloon owner Mawson. When Miss Abott disappears, Hoppy gets a clue to her location and rescues her from Mawson's cabin. It looks like Mawson is the man he wants, but Hoppy finds an item that indicates otherwise.
14.
The Gay Intruders (1948) as Art Director
John and Maria are successful onstage but have marriage problems offstage. When they go to married psychiatrists Dr. Matson and Dr. Nash, they grow together as the doctors begin to fight.
15.
Unknown Island (1948) as Art Director
Adventure-seeker Ted Osborne has convinced his finacee Carole to finance his expedition to an uncharted South Pacific island supposedly populated with dinosaurs. Piloting their ship is Captain Tarnowski, a ruthless alcoholic suffering from malaria- induced bouts of insanity. When they arrive at the island, they discover that the stories they have heard are all true. Will they survive to tell anyone what they've found?
16.
Jungle Patrol (1948) as Art Director
17.
False Paradise (1948) as Art Director
After Bentley sells Professor Larson a worthless ranch, Hoppy tells banker Waite there is silver on the ranch. Waite tells Bentley and Bentley tries to buy it back. When he fails, Waite lends money to finance a mine but puts a 30 day due date on it. Hoppy takes over running the mine but Bentley puts his henchman to work to make sure the venture fails.
18.
Here Comes Trouble (1948) as Art Director
A newspaper publisher and his ace reporter try to solve the murder of a blackmailing stripper.
19.
Sinister Journey (1948) as Art Director
20.
The Fabulous Joe (1947) as Art Director
To quote a Marine D.I. in San Diego or John Wayne in several movies, "Listen up, we ain't going to plow this ground twice." In 1947, Hal Roach made a film called "Curly", which was an expanded version of 1930's "Our Gang" short "Teacher's Pet", with Frances Rafferty and Larry Olsen taking the roles played by June Marlowe and Jackie Cooper in the original short. Hal Roach also made a film called "The Fabulous Joe", basically about a drunk, a talking dog, gangsters and Marie Wilson running around in her skivvies. The two films, intended as bottom-half of a double feature, were released about two weeks apart, with "Curly" going out first. "The Fabulous Joe" came about two weeks later. At the same time, the two films were stitched together and offered, with the combined running time of 112 minutes, to exhibitors who didn't play double features. The film listed on this page, "Hal Roach's Comedy Carnival", is the result. "Curly" was an attempt by Hal Roach, who no longer owned the rights to "Our Gang" (aka "The Little Rascals") to create a version of "Our Gang" with a new set of kids, which would be known as "Curly and His Gang", and would be feature-length films in Cinecolor. "Curly" was the first one in the series and was followed in 1948 by "Who Killed "Doc" Robbin" with the same kids from "Curly" playing the same roles. Later, "Curly" and "Who Killed 'Doc' Robbin" were packaged together as "The Adventures of Curly and His Gang" for theatres and later sold to televison, and there are sources who keep adding the adult cast from the "Doc Robbin" film (Don Castle, Virginia Grey, Claire DuBrey, Paul Hurst and others)incorrectly to the cast of "Curly." The fun part of "Hal Roach's Comedy Carnival" is that it is comprised of two films that are about as opposite of each other as films can be. "The Fabulous Joe" is a screwball comedy filled with double entendre dialogue and scenes and as "Adult" as a film of the 40's could be and still get PCA approval. "Curly", as mentioned, is "Our Gang" updated and in color.
21.
Curley (1947) as Art Director
When their favorite teacher marries, a gang of kids tries to scare her replacement away.
22.
Deadline for Murder (1946) as Art Director
23.
Rendezvous 24 (1946) as Art Director
24.
A Close Call for Boston Blackie (1946) as Art Director
A reformed thief fights to clear himself of murder charges.
25.
The Gentleman Misbehaves (1946) as Art Director
26.
Rhythm Round-up (1945) as Art Director
27.
Out of the Depths (1945) as Art Director
28.
Youth on Trial (1945) as Art Director
A hard-boiled juvenile court judge orders that a popular road house be raided because she knows it is a popular hangout for young punks but then is appalled when the cops bring in her own daughter with the rest of the delinquents.
29.
The Girl of the Limberlost (1945) as Art Director
Based on Gene Stratton-Porter's novel and a remake of Columbia's 1934 "The Girl of the Limberlost" and 1939's "Romance of the Limberlost," this one has altered the kinship who-hates-the-girl relationship from an aunt to her mother. This time out, Elnora Comstock (Dorinda Clifton) lives on the edge of a great swamp and collects butterflies to sell in order to go to high school and pay for violin lessons. Her mother, Kate Comstock (Ruth Nelson), hates her as she blames the girl for the father's death as he drowned in a quagmire on the way home the night the girl was born. The years-late revelation that the husband had been off courting a neighbor woman that night brings an attitude adjustment to the mother.
30.
Prison Ship (1945) as Art Director
31.
The Gay Senorita (1945) as Art Director
Business development prompts an effort to drive out the residents of the Mexican portion of a California town. Against the move is the growing love for a senorita.
32.
My Name Is Julia Ross (1945) as Art Director
A young girl finds herself entrenched in a murder cover-up when she goes to work for a wealthy widow.
33.
Escape in the Fog (1945) as Art Director
A nurse recovering from a breakdown keeps dreaming about murder.
34.
Daring Young Man (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
35.
Underground Agent (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
36.
Blondie for Victory (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
Blondie organizes Housewives of America to perform homefront wartime duties, including guarding the local dam. Dagwood and the other husbands don't care to be left home doing the cooking and taking care of the kids, so Dagwood pretends to join the Army. Blondie disbands the organization and comes home.
37.
Blondie's Blessed Event (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
38.
Shut My Big Mouth (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
(Com '42,BW). Joe E. Brown, Adele Mara, Victor Jory, Fritz Feld, Don Beddoe, Pedro de Cordoba, Lloyd Bridges, Forrest Tucker, Chief Thunder-Cloud. A meek easterner (Joe E. Brown) unwittingly becomes sheriff of a western town and resorts to dressing in drag in order to foil the plans of the villainous Victor Jory. One of Joe E. Brown's most popular comedies.
39.
Sweetheart of the Fleet (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
40.
Blondie Goes to College (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
Dagwood decides to go to college. Blondie goes along with him, keeping their marriage a secret. They send Baby Dumpling off to military school where he becomes top sergeant. Blondie is hounded by the campus stud and Dagwood makes the rowing team. It is revealed that a new child is on the way.
41.
Atlantic Convoy (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
42.
Hello Annapolis (1942) as Associate (Art Direction)
43.
Tillie the Toiler (1941) as Art Director
44.
Blondie in Society (1941) as Art Director
Dagwood brings home a pedigreed Great Dane which an important company client wants and which Blondie enters in the big dog show. A highlight of this film is the canine burping display.
45.
Her First Beau (1941) as Art Director
46.
Blondie Goes Latin (1941) as Art Director
47.
Go West, Young Lady (1941) as Art Director
A sheriff's girlfriend tries to unearth the identity of a masked bandit chief.

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