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Eleanor Powell

Eleanor Powell

  • Thousands Cheer (1943) October 03 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: February 11, 1982
Born: November 21, 1912 Cause of Death: ovarian cancer
Birth Place: Springfield, Massachusetts, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

:
Began ballet lessons as a child; did not study tap until much later in the mid-1920s
1925:
Hired for first professional engagement by Gus Edwards; performed at the dinner show at the Ambassador Hotel in Atlantic City, New Jersey
1927:
Became emcee at the Martins Club
1929:
Broadway debut in "Follow Thru"
1930:
Film debut in a dance sequence in "Queen High"
1931:
Appeared with Anita Page and Fanny Brice in "Crazy Quilt" on Broadway
:
Achieved success on the musical comedy stage in the early 1930s; came to films known as "The World's Greatest Female Tap Dancer"
1935:
Made feature film debut in Fox's "George White's 1935 Scandals"
1935:
Became a star at MGM in "Broadway Melody of 1936"
1936:
Co-starred with James Stewart in "Born to Dance"
1937:
Had title role in "Rosalie"
1940:
Teamed with Fred Astaire in "Broadway Melody of 1940"
1941:
Saw star status slip a bit when given second lead in "Lady Be Good"; also first of three films with Red Skelton
:
Lost several roles to the much younger Judy Garland
1943:
One of many guest stars to appear in the fund-raising musical, "Thousands Cheer"
1943:
Left MGM after completing "I Dood It", co-starring Skelton
1944:
Last starring vehicle, "Sensations of 1945"
1950:
Returned to films to dance a solo routine in the Esther Williams musical, "The Duchess of Idaho"
1953:
Hosted the religious-themed TV program "Faith of Our Children"; won five local area Emmy Awards
:
Performed a nightclub act, including gigs at the Sands Hotel in Las Vegas and the London Palladium
:
Resurfaced in the mid-1970s with release of compilation films "That's Entertainment" (1974) and "That's Entertainment, Part 2" (1976)
1981:
Made final TV appearance at the AFI tribute to Fred Astaire

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