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Overview for Cole Porter
Cole Porter

Cole Porter

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Also Known As: Died: October 15, 1964
Born: June 9, 1891 Cause of Death: kidney failure
Birth Place: Peru, Indiana, USA Profession: Music ...
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1901:
Wrote his first piece of music, "Song of the Birds"
1902:
His mother arranged for private publication of the song "The Bobolink Waltz"
1910:
First published song, "Bridget"
:
While attending Yale, wrote several football songs invluding "Bingo Eli Yale" and "Bull Dog"
1911:
First musical "Cora" produced at Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity at Yale
1915:
First song featured on Broadway, "As I Loved You" (originally titled "Esmeralda") included in the show "Kaleidoscope"
1916:
Wrote his first full score for a professional theatrical production, "See America First"
1918:
Served in the foreign legion during WWI
1919:
Returned to the USA; wrote songs for "Hitchy-Koo of 1919"
1920:
Studied at Schola Cantorum in Paris
1923:
Collaborated on the ballet "Within the Quota" with Gerald Murphy (librettist and donor)
1924:
Wrote the score for "Greenwich Village 'Follies'"
1929:
Composed the score for "Fifty Million Frenchmen," including such hits as "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love"
1930:
Song "Love for Sale" introduced in the show "The New Yorkers"; banned from radio air play
1932:
First collaboration with Fred Astaire, the Broadway show "The Gay Divorce"
1933:
Wrote "Nymph Errant" for Gertrude Lawrence
1934:
Initial outing in Hollywood, the film "The Gay Divorcee"; film, which featured Astaire, only used one Porter song from the stage show, "Night and Day"
1934:
Had a Broadway hit with "Anything Goes," starring Ethel Merman
1934:
Wrote the score for the unproduced film "Adios, Argentina"
1935:
In December, signed 20-week contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer for $3,000 per week to write score for "Born to Dance", starring James Stewart and Eleanor Powell
1936:
Received his first Academy Award nomination for the song "I've Got You Under My Skin" (from "Born to Dance")
1936:
"Red, Hot and Blue" opened on Broadway; show featured Jimmy Durante, Bob Hope and Ethel Merman and introduced the classic "It's DeLovely"
1937:
Crippled in a riding accident (Porter's legs were crushed when a horse fell on him); underwent first of eventual 30 operations to save his legs; Porter later claimed to have written some of the lyrics for the score to "At Long Last Love" while waiting for help
1938:
Mary Martin had a hit with Porter's "My Heart Belongs to Daddy"
1939:
Bert Lahr and Ethel Merman starred in Porter's "DuBarry Was a Lady"
1940:
Merman scores a triumph as "Panama Hattie"; show becomes the longest-running of Porter's shows to date (first of his book musicals to run for over 500 performances since the 1920s)
1941:
Earned his second Oscar nomination for the song "Since I Kissed My Baby Goodbye" (from "You'll Never Get Rich")
1943:
Reteamed with Merman for "Something for the Boys"
1943:
Received his third Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song for "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" (from "Something to Shout About"
1946:
Was the subject of the Warner Bros. film biography "Night and Day"; Cary Grant portrayed Porter
1948:
Had his biggest career success with "Kiss Me, Kate", a musical inspired by Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew"; the show ran for 1,077 performances and won the Best Musical Tony Award
1948:
Wrote the score for "The Pirate," starring Gene Kelly and Judy Garland
1949:
Composed the song "Farewell, Amanda," used in "Amanda's Rib"
1953:
"Kiss Me Kate" filmed
1955:
Last original stage musical, "Silk Stockings"
1956:
Earned his final Oscar nomination for "True Love," sung in the film "High Society" by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly
1957:
Final features released to contain full Porter scores, "Silk Stockings" and "Les Girls"
1958:
Wrote the score for the TV special "Alladin"; last songs written include "Come to the Supermarket in Old Peking" and "Wouldn't It Be Fun?"
1986:
Premiere of "High Society" as a stage musical in London
1998:
A revised version of "High Society" opened on Broadway
2000:
First Broadway revival of "Kiss Me, Kate"

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