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Cole Porter

Cole Porter

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Also Known As: Died: October 15, 1964
Born: June 9, 1891 Cause of Death: kidney failure
Birth Place: Peru, Indiana, USA Profession: lyricist, composer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

As a musician, Cole Porter's entertaining and creative music was in a variety of Hollywood productions. The early stages of his career in entertainment ran the industry gamut with credits like "The Battle of Paris" (1929) to his name. Porter was nominated for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Something to Shout About" in 1943 as well as for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "High Society" in 1956. In the eighties, Porter devoted his time to various credits, such as "Radio Days" (1987) starring Mia Farrow, "September" (1987), "Frantic" with Harrison Ford (1988) and "The Blue Iguana" (1988). Porter last provided music for "Robert's Movie." Porter was married to Linda Lee Thomas. Cole Porter passed away in October 1964 at the age of 73.

As a musician, Cole Porter's entertaining and creative music was in a variety of Hollywood productions. The early stages of his career in entertainment ran the industry gamut with credits like "The Battle of Paris" (1929) to his name. Porter was nominated for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "Something to Shout About" in 1943 as well as for a Music (Song) Academy Award for "High Society" in 1956. In the eighties, Porter devoted his time to various credits, such as "Radio Days" (1987) starring Mia Farrow, "September" (1987), "Frantic" with Harrison Ford (1988) and "The Blue Iguana" (1988). Porter last provided music for "Robert's Movie." Porter was married to Linda Lee Thomas. Cole Porter passed away in October 1964 at the age of 73.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 De-Lovely (2004) Musical Performer ("You'Re The Top")
2.
 You're the Top (1956) Host
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1901:
Wrote his first piece of music, "Song of the Birds"
1902:
His mother arranged for private publication of the song "The Bobolink Waltz"
1910:
First published song, "Bridget"
:
While attending Yale, wrote several football songs invluding "Bingo Eli Yale" and "Bull Dog"
1911:
First musical "Cora" produced at Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity at Yale
1915:
First song featured on Broadway, "As I Loved You" (originally titled "Esmeralda") included in the show "Kaleidoscope"
1916:
Wrote his first full score for a professional theatrical production, "See America First"
1918:
Served in the foreign legion during WWI
1919:
Returned to the USA; wrote songs for "Hitchy-Koo of 1919"
1920:
Studied at Schola Cantorum in Paris
1923:
Collaborated on the ballet "Within the Quota" with Gerald Murphy (librettist and donor)
1924:
Wrote the score for "Greenwich Village 'Follies'"
1929:
Composed the score for "Fifty Million Frenchmen," including such hits as "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love"
1930:
Song "Love for Sale" introduced in the show "The New Yorkers"; banned from radio air play
1932:
First collaboration with Fred Astaire, the Broadway show "The Gay Divorce"
1933:
Wrote "Nymph Errant" for Gertrude Lawrence
1934:
Initial outing in Hollywood, the film "The Gay Divorcee"; film, which featured Astaire, only used one Porter song from the stage show, "Night and Day"
1934:
Had a Broadway hit with "Anything Goes," starring Ethel Merman
1934:
Wrote the score for the unproduced film "Adios, Argentina"
1935:
In December, signed 20-week contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer for $3,000 per week to write score for "Born to Dance", starring James Stewart and Eleanor Powell
1936:
Received his first Academy Award nomination for the song "I've Got You Under My Skin" (from "Born to Dance")
1936:
"Red, Hot and Blue" opened on Broadway; show featured Jimmy Durante, Bob Hope and Ethel Merman and introduced the classic "It's DeLovely"
1937:
Crippled in a riding accident (Porter's legs were crushed when a horse fell on him); underwent first of eventual 30 operations to save his legs; Porter later claimed to have written some of the lyrics for the score to "At Long Last Love" while waiting for help
1938:
Mary Martin had a hit with Porter's "My Heart Belongs to Daddy"
1939:
Bert Lahr and Ethel Merman starred in Porter's "DuBarry Was a Lady"
1940:
Merman scores a triumph as "Panama Hattie"; show becomes the longest-running of Porter's shows to date (first of his book musicals to run for over 500 performances since the 1920s)
1941:
Earned his second Oscar nomination for the song "Since I Kissed My Baby Goodbye" (from "You'll Never Get Rich")
1943:
Reteamed with Merman for "Something for the Boys"
1943:
Received his third Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song for "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" (from "Something to Shout About"
1946:
Was the subject of the Warner Bros. film biography "Night and Day"; Cary Grant portrayed Porter
1948:
Had his biggest career success with "Kiss Me, Kate", a musical inspired by Shakespeare's "The Taming of the Shrew"; the show ran for 1,077 performances and won the Best Musical Tony Award
1948:
Wrote the score for "The Pirate," starring Gene Kelly and Judy Garland
1949:
Composed the song "Farewell, Amanda," used in "Amanda's Rib"
1953:
"Kiss Me Kate" filmed
1955:
Last original stage musical, "Silk Stockings"
1956:
Earned his final Oscar nomination for "True Love," sung in the film "High Society" by Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly
1957:
Final features released to contain full Porter scores, "Silk Stockings" and "Les Girls"
1958:
Wrote the score for the TV special "Alladin"; last songs written include "Come to the Supermarket in Old Peking" and "Wouldn't It Be Fun?"
1986:
Premiere of "High Society" as a stage musical in London
1998:
A revised version of "High Society" opened on Broadway
2000:
First Broadway revival of "Kiss Me, Kate"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Worcester Academy: Worcester , Massachusetts - 1905 - 1909
Yale College, Yale University: New Haven , Connecticut - 1909 - 1913
Harvard Law School: Cambridge , Massachusetts - 1913 - 1914
Harvard School of Music: Cambridge , Massachusetts - 1914 - 1915

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Linda Lee Thomas. Met in January 1918; had been married previously and widowed; married from December 18, 1919 until her death in May 20, 1954 at age 70.

Family close complete family listing

grandfather:
James Omar Cole. Businessman. Helped to finance Porter's education.
father:
Samuel Fenwick Porter. Druggist. Married Porter's mother in 1884; died in 1927.
mother:
Kate Cole Porter. Married Porter's father in 1884; died on August 3, 1952 at age 90.
brother:
Louis Porter. Older; died in infancy.
sister:
Rachel Porter. Older; died in infancy.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"The Life That Late He Led"
"Cole Porter: A Biography" Alfred A. Knopf

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