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Sidney Poitier

Sidney Poitier

  • Something Of Value (1957) October 10 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Blackboard Jungle (1955) November 07 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Something Of Value (1957) November 17 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Good-Bye, My Lady (1956) November 30 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died:
Born: February 20, 1927 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Miami, Florida, USA Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

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Born in Miami, Florida when parents took a trip there to sell their produce
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Raised on Cat Island in the Bahamas
1940:
Dropped out of school at age 13
1942:
Moved to Miami at age 15 to live with his brother Cyril
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Relocated to New York City where he worked as a dishwasher and busboy in restaurants
1941:
Served in the US Army as a physiotherapist
1945:
Joined American Negro Theater and made stage debut in "Days of Our Youth" as Harry Belafonte's understudy
1946:
Broadway debut as understudy for all of the male roles in the American Negro Theater's all-black production of "Lysistrata"
1947:
Starred in the Broadway production of "Anna Lucasta"
1949:
Film debut, appearing in the Army Corps documentary short, "From Whence Cometh My Help"
1950:
Made feature film debut in Darryl F. Zanuck's "No Way Out"
1952:
TV acting debut in NBC's "The Philco Television Playhouse"
1958:
Received first Academy Award nomination for Stanley Kramer's "The Defiant Ones"; first black male to receive nomination
1959:
Returned to Broadway in Lorraine Hansberry's "A Raisin in the Sun"; first Broadway play written by a black woman; also first time a black man (Lloyd Richards) directed a Broadway show
1961:
Reprised Broadway role for Daniel Petrie's film version of "A Raisin in the Sun"
1963:
Became first Black actor to win an Academy Award for Best Actor for "Lilies of the Field"
1965:
Portrayed an African American man, who falls in love with blind white female in "A Patch of Blue"
1967:
Had starring roles in three hit movies; "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," "To Sir, With Love" and "In the Heat of the Night"
1968:
Made stage directing debut with Broadway production of "Carry Me Back to Morningside Heights"
1968:
Wrote original story for the film "For Love of Ivy"; also starred
1969:
Formed First Artists production company with Paul Newman, Barbra Streisand and others
1970:
Reprised "In the Heat of the Night" role for the sequel, "They Call Me Mister Tibbs"
1971:
Once again reprised role of Virgil Tibbs for the third film, "The Organization"
1972:
Feature directorial debut, "Buck and the Preacher"
1975:
Directed and starred opposite Bill Cosby in "Let's Do It Again"
1977:
Last feature acting role for more than a decade in "A Piece of the Action"; also directed
1980:
Directed Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor in "Stir Crazy"; first time directing a feature in which he did not also act
1980:
Penned his autobiography, <i>This Life</i>
1988:
Returned to acting with roles in Roger Spottiswoode's "Shoot to Kill" and Richard Benjamin's "Little Nikita"
1991:
Earned Emmy and Golden Globe nominations for his portrayal of Thurgood Marshall the ABC miniseries "Separate But Equal"
1992:
Joined an all-star cast for the high-tech caper, "Sneakers"
1996:
Reprised role of Mark Thackaray 30 years later in the Peter Bogdanovich directed, "To Sir, With Love II" (CBS)
1997:
Co-starred with Michael Caine for the Showtime miniseries, "Mandela and De Klerk"
1997:
Played FBI Deputy Director Carter Preston in Michael Caton-Jones' "The Jackal"
1999:
Had lead role in the highly-rated CBS TV-movie "The Simple Life of Noah Dearborn"
2000:
Helmed second autobiographical work, <i>The Measure of a Man: A Spiritual Autobiography</i>
2001:
Appeared in the CBS telefilm, "The Last Brickmaker in America"
2008:
Penned his third book, <i>Life Beyond Measure - letters to my Great-Granddaughter</i>; earned a Grammy nomination for Best Spoken Word for the CD version

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