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Susan Peters

Susan Peters

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Also Known As: Suzanne Carnahan, Suzanne Carnahan Died: October 23, 1952
Born: July 3, 1921 Cause of Death: complications from a spinal injury
Birth Place: Spokane, Washington, USA Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A lovely and promising actress who worked her way up the ranks at MGM, Susan Peters' career was cut short by one of the worst tragedies to affect the Hollywood acting community during the 1940s. After an unpromising start, the Spokane native had her first substantial part in the MGM film "Tish" (1942) and soon became a regular player for the studio. Her most famous credit was the celebrated drama "Random Harvest" (1942), where Peters impressed greatly in a supporting capacity. With an Oscar nomination now on her résumé, she demonstrated further promise in such productions as "Song of Russia" (1944), in which she essayed the female lead role opposite Robert Taylor. In a tragic turn of events, Peters was crippled in a hunting accident, but within a few months, she had resumed acting via radio assignments and was determined to move forward. Her movie days were over after only one more picture, but Peters earned praise for stage performances in travelling revivals of "The Glass Menagerie" and "The Barretts of Wimpole Street," and she also headlined her own television series for a time. Unfortunately, the strain of dealing with her condition caused Peters to plunge into depression and anorexia nervosa,...

A lovely and promising actress who worked her way up the ranks at MGM, Susan Peters' career was cut short by one of the worst tragedies to affect the Hollywood acting community during the 1940s. After an unpromising start, the Spokane native had her first substantial part in the MGM film "Tish" (1942) and soon became a regular player for the studio. Her most famous credit was the celebrated drama "Random Harvest" (1942), where Peters impressed greatly in a supporting capacity. With an Oscar nomination now on her résumé, she demonstrated further promise in such productions as "Song of Russia" (1944), in which she essayed the female lead role opposite Robert Taylor. In a tragic turn of events, Peters was crippled in a hunting accident, but within a few months, she had resumed acting via radio assignments and was determined to move forward. Her movie days were over after only one more picture, but Peters earned praise for stage performances in travelling revivals of "The Glass Menagerie" and "The Barretts of Wimpole Street," and she also headlined her own television series for a time. Unfortunately, the strain of dealing with her condition caused Peters to plunge into depression and anorexia nervosa, both of which sapped her will to live and contributed to her premature death at age 31. Although the final years of her life were heartbreaking, Peters displayed considerable courage and the praise for her acting, both before and after the tragedy, was well-deserved.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 The Sign of the Ram (1948) Leah St. Aubyn
2.
 Keep Your Powder Dry (1945) Ann Darrison
3.
 Song of Russia (1944) [Nadejka Ivanovna] Nadya Stepanova
4.
 Assignment in Brittany (1943) Anne Pinot
5.
 Young Ideas (1943) Susan Evans
6.
 Tish (1942) Cora Edwards
7.
 Random Harvest (1942) Kitty
8.
9.
 Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant (1942) Mrs. Howard Allwinn Young [also known as Claire Merton]
10.
 The Big Shot (1942) Ruth Carter
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Milestones close milestones

:
Stage appearance in a production of "Holiday" led to her being briefly signed by Warner Brothers
1940:
Began in films, playing bit parts in films including "Susan and God" and "Santa Fe Trail"; in several cases worked using her birth name
1942:
Signed as contract player by MGM
1942:
Played first leading lady roles in "Dr. Gillespie's New Assistant" and "Tish"
1942:
Received an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress for "Random Harvest"
1943:
Received top billing in the film, "Young Ideas"
1944:
Promoted from "featured player" to "star" on MGM's list of contract players; others "promoted" that same year included Esther Williams, Margaret O'Brien and George Murphy
1944:
Suffered severe spinal injury in a hunting accident
1945:
Last film for three years, "Keep Your Powder Dry" (filmed in 1944; released in March 1945)
1948:
Returned to features; made her last film, "Sign of the Ram", playing the leading role of a wheelchair-bound character
1951:
Last professional work included her TV series debut: played wheelchair-bound lawyer "Susan Peters" on the 15-minute NBC courtroom drama series, "Miss Susan"
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Education

Max Reinhardt's School of Dramatic Arts: Los Angeles , California -

Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Richard Quine. Director, former actor. Married in 1943; divorced in 1948.

Contributions

Dotsie ( 2011-02-04 )

Source: not available

Susan Peters played the part of Elizabeth Barrett Browning in the Barretts of Wimpole Street at Ivar Theatre in LA and in New York city sponsored by George Brandt in 1950-51. My mother, Hildreth of Hollywood, designed and made Miss Peters costumes which were made specifically for her to change into while in a wheel chair as well as her personal clothing.

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