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Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker

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Also Known As: Dorothy Rothschild Died: June 7, 1967
Born: August 22, 1891 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: West End, New Jersey, USA Profession: screenwriter, poet, critic, satirist, short story writer

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A tart-tongued wit and prolific writer of reviews, poetry, short stories, plays and screenplays, founding member of the famed Algonquin Hotel Round Table Dorothy Parker parlayed her caustic barbs into a successful career as a writer in numerous mediums. Troubled and obsessive, Parker was unpredictable and self-destructive, attempting suicide several times in her life, while growing increasingly dependent on alcohol. Still, she remained a prolific writer throughout her career for magazines like Vogue, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Smart Set and LIFE while becoming more politically active in leftist causes. She married actor and writer Alan Campbell, which led to a Hollywood career writing screenplays for "Nothing Sacred" (1937), "A Star Is Born" (1938) and "Saboteur" (1942), while helping to form the Screenwriters Guild, only to find herself blacklisted by 1950 because of her Communist affiliations. She left Hollywood for New York to write plays and a regular book review column for Esquire, though her growing alcoholism hampered her coherence. Though she died quietly in 1967, Parker remained a vital nerve in the cultural zeitgeist whose contributions to literature, film and non-fiction were...

A tart-tongued wit and prolific writer of reviews, poetry, short stories, plays and screenplays, founding member of the famed Algonquin Hotel Round Table Dorothy Parker parlayed her caustic barbs into a successful career as a writer in numerous mediums. Troubled and obsessive, Parker was unpredictable and self-destructive, attempting suicide several times in her life, while growing increasingly dependent on alcohol. Still, she remained a prolific writer throughout her career for magazines like Vogue, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker, Smart Set and LIFE while becoming more politically active in leftist causes. She married actor and writer Alan Campbell, which led to a Hollywood career writing screenplays for "Nothing Sacred" (1937), "A Star Is Born" (1938) and "Saboteur" (1942), while helping to form the Screenwriters Guild, only to find herself blacklisted by 1950 because of her Communist affiliations. She left Hollywood for New York to write plays and a regular book review column for Esquire, though her growing alcoholism hampered her coherence. Though she died quietly in 1967, Parker remained a vital nerve in the cultural zeitgeist whose contributions to literature, film and non-fiction were unparalleled.

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CAST: (feature film)

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:
Born in West End, New Jersey to a Jewish father and British mother
1908:
Cease formal education at age 15
1914:
Worked as pianist for a dance school
1915:
Was a writer for <i>Vogue</i> magazine
1917:
Appointed theatre critic for <i>Vanity Fair</i> magazine
1919:
First meeting of Algonquin Hotel 'round table' group, headed by Alexander Woollcott
1920:
Fired by <i>Vanity Fair</i>
1920:
Made drama critic for <i>Ainslee's Magazine</i>; also contributed to magazines <i>Smart Set, Saturday Evening Post</i>, and <i>Life</i>, among others
1922:
Collaborated with Robert Benchley on one-act play "Nero" for inclusion in revue "The 49ers/No Siree"
1923:
Attempted suicide
1924:
With George S Kaufman wrote "Business is Business", one act curtain raiser to accompany premiere run of film "Beggars on Horseback"
1924:
With Elmer Rice wrote Broadway play "Close Harmony"
1925:
Member of advisory committee overseeing the founding of <i>The New Yorker</i> magazine by Harold Ross
1926:
Second suicide attempt
1926:
European tour
1927:
Book reviewer for <i>The New Yorker</i>
1927:
Attended demonstration in Boston in support of convicted anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti
1928:
Divorced husband Parker after years of separation
1929:
Moved to Hollywood with MGM contract; returned in three months
1931:
Third suicide attempt
1931:
Contributed material to revue "Shoot the Works"
1934:
Married writer/actor Alan Campbell
1934:
She and Campbell go to Hollywood under contract to Paramount
1937:
Traveled to Spain to report on the civil war for <i>New Masses</i> magazine
1937:
Co-founded Hollywood Anti-Nazi League
1937:
Helped organize Screenwriters Guild
1937:
She and Campbell have successive contracts with Goldwyn, MGM and Columbia
1939:
With Campbell adapted Hungarian play "The Happiest Man" by Miklos Laszlo; unproduced
1946:
Divorced Campbell
1949:
Her play "The Coast of Illyria" is produced in Dallas; also productions in London and Edinburgh
1950:
Named in pamphlet Red Channels as communist sympathizer and is "greylisted"
1950:
Remarried Alan Campbell
1953:
With Arnaud d'Usseau wrote play, "Ladies of the Corridor"; Harold Clurman directed
1955:
Appeared as witness before New York State Legislation Committee investigation into funding of Communist Party
1955:
Collaborated with d'Usseau on play "The Ice Age" but it remained unproduced
1956:
Contributed lyrics for one song for Leonard Bernstein's nusical "Candide"
1958:
Had regular book review column in <i>Esquire</i>
:
Taught English at California State College
1963:
Death of Alan Campbell
1964:
Left California and returned to New York
1969:
West End revue based on her writings, "As Dorothy Parker Once Said..."
1994:
Film bio, "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle," released
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Education

Blessed Sacrament Academy: -
Miss Dana's Boarding School: - 1907 - 1908

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husband:
Edward Pond Parker III. Married in 1917; divorced 1928.
husband:
Alan Campbell. Writer; actor. Married 1934; divorced 1946; remarried 1950; died 1963.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Enough Rope"
"Sunset Gun"
"Laments for the Living"
"Death and Taxes"
"After Such Pleasures"
"Not So Deep As A Well"
"Here Lies"
"The Collected Stories of Dorothy Parker"
"The Portable Dorothy Parker"
"The Collected Poetry of Dorothy Parker"
"Short Story: A Thematic Anthology"
"Constant Reader"
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