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Lena Olin

Lena Olin

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: March 22, 1955 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Sweden Profession: actor, hospital orderly, substitute teacher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A powerful and beautiful Swedish actress in the tradition of Greta Garbo, Ingrid Bergman and Liv Ullmann, Lena Olin first came to prominence in Sweden as a "Bergman actress," working in plays and films directed by the great Ingmar Bergman. The child of actors-her father, Stig Olin, appeared in Bergman films during the 1940s and 50s-she gravitated to the profession in an attempt to overcome her crippling shyness, and though she failed her first audition for the Royal Dramatic Theater school, Bergman saw enough to cast her in a small role in his "Face to Face" (1976). She went on to appear in "The Adventures of Picasso" (1978) and acted for Bergman in "Fanny and Alexander" (1982). In "After the Rehearsal" (1984), she played Anna, a character written expressly for her. Her role as an actress who infuriates her director by getting pregnant while working on one of August Strindberg's plays prefigured actual events when her own pregnancy would complicate a Bergman production of Strindberg's "A Dream Play."Olin's performance as Cordelia in a Bergman-directed "King Lear" at Stockholm's Royal Dramatic Theater in 1985 brought her to the attention of Bertil Ohlsson, executive producer of Philip Kaufman's "The...

A powerful and beautiful Swedish actress in the tradition of Greta Garbo, Ingrid Bergman and Liv Ullmann, Lena Olin first came to prominence in Sweden as a "Bergman actress," working in plays and films directed by the great Ingmar Bergman. The child of actors-her father, Stig Olin, appeared in Bergman films during the 1940s and 50s-she gravitated to the profession in an attempt to overcome her crippling shyness, and though she failed her first audition for the Royal Dramatic Theater school, Bergman saw enough to cast her in a small role in his "Face to Face" (1976). She went on to appear in "The Adventures of Picasso" (1978) and acted for Bergman in "Fanny and Alexander" (1982). In "After the Rehearsal" (1984), she played Anna, a character written expressly for her. Her role as an actress who infuriates her director by getting pregnant while working on one of August Strindberg's plays prefigured actual events when her own pregnancy would complicate a Bergman production of Strindberg's "A Dream Play."

Olin's performance as Cordelia in a Bergman-directed "King Lear" at Stockholm's Royal Dramatic Theater in 1985 brought her to the attention of Bertil Ohlsson, executive producer of Philip Kaufman's "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" (1988), adapted from Milan Kundera's best-selling novel of love and eroticism set against the 1968 Russian invasion of Czechoslovakia. Her turn in that film as Sabina, the bowler hat-wearing artist-mistress of Daniel Day-Lewis, was the first of a series of smart, sexy roles showcasing her unique bearing and dancer's grace, helping to establish her international reputation as a "thinking man's beauty." Whereas the kinky Sabina's sexual proclivities served as a counterpoint to political oppression, the suicidal Masha in Paul Mazursky's "Enemies, a Love Story" (1989) used sex to escape the pain and humiliation of her Holocaust past. Comfortable with her body, Olin appeared in both films without her clothes, and "Enemies" contained sex scenes as graphic as an R rating permitted, prompting the actress to remark that "nudity is just another costume."

Oscar-nominated for her supporting turn as Masha, Olin continued her penchant for films with a background of political upheaval, acting opposite Robert Redford in the Sydney Pollack-directed "Havana" (1990), a disappointing "Casablanca"-like tale of Cuba in the late 50s, perhaps unjustly maligned as a complete bomb. After making her New York theater debut with a moving turn as the tormented titular character in a 1991 Swedish-language production of "Miss Julie," directed by Bergman, she returned to the screen opposite Richard Gere in the dubious "Mr. Jones" (1993), a dull doctor-patient love story with little foundation in reality. She fared far better as the standout of that year's "Romeo Is Bleeding," playing her most outrageous role to date, a psychopathic, Russian assassin (with thighs of steel) who even cuts off her arm to evade capture. She also sandwiched two European flicks, the moribund "The Night & the Moment" (1994) and the slick Swedish actioner "Hamilton" (1998), around Sidney Lumet's "Night Falls on Manhattan" (1997), in which she romanced Andy Garcia.

An instinctual actress who won't look at rushes for fear she might inhibit herself and start to think, Olin completely disdains the perks of stardom, and her indifference to celebrity makes her cautious around the press. Few of her peers, however, can play the complicated, ambiguous characters which are her staple, figures existing on several emotional levels at once, often on the edge of madness. In Teresa Connelly's "Polish Wedding" (1998) she relished her role as a strong-willed mother of five who, although her family means everything to her, still tries to capture the excitement of her youth through illicit love. Olin had a small role as psychiatrist to Casanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush) in the superhero send-up "Mystery Men" (1999) and then performed her determined hellcat routine with gusto as a leader of a satanic cult for Roman Polanski's "The Ninth Gate," its US release moved back three months to March 2000 to give a little more separation between it and another supernatural picture also starring Johnny Depp, Tim Burton's "Sleepy Hollow."

The actress finally achieved the long-held dream of working with her director husband Lasse Hallstrom on "Chocolat" (2000), a delicious morality play with a subtle message about tolerance. Cast as Josephine, a kleptomaniac and abused wife who is shunned by the townspeople, Olin was terrific in the part, particularly in the character's transformation from mousy doormat to chocolate maker under the watchful eye of the mysterious Vianne (Juliette Binoche). Having done some of her best work in years, she followed up as the maternal vampire Maharet in "Queen of the Damned" (2001), based on Anne Rice's novel. Olin resurfaced on American television in 2002 in the form of the "Alias" (2002- ) recurring character Irina Derevko/Laura Bristow, the mysterious double agent mother of lead character Syndney Bristow (Jennifer Garner). Despite an impressive performance, an impasse in contract negotiations ultimately led her to ultimately leave the series.

She also was featured in a high profile role as Harrison Ford's love interest in writer-director Ron Shelton's action comedy "Hollywood Homicide" (2003). Meanwhile, the actress starred as Maria, the mother in an American family that moves into an old house in the remote countryside of Spain, in director Jaume Balaguero's second stab at the horror genre, "Darkness" (2004). Though filmed in 2001, it was released in the United States in December 2004 to poor reviews and mediocre box office. Olin's next effort "Casanova" (2005), director Lasse Hallstrom's fictionalized account of the legendary lothario (Heath Ledger) falling in love at last, was easily one of the most ill-conceived and disappointing films of the year, despite lavish production values and game performances by Olin--as the debt-ridden noblewoman who enters her daughter (Sienna Miller) into a marriage of convenience--and the rest of the all-star cast.

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 Hypnotist, The (2012)
3.
 Remember Me (2010)
4.
 Reader, The (2008)
5.
 Awake (2007)
6.
7.
 Casanova (2005)
8.
 Darkness (2004) Maria
9.
 United States of Leland, The (2003) Marybeth Fitzgerald
10.
 Hollywood Homicide (2003) Ruby
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1972:
Met Ingmar Bergman for the first time at the age of 17
:
Worked as a substitute teacher and hospital orderly before enterting acting
1976:
Cast in a small role by Bergman in "Face to Face"
1978:
Joined the Royal Dramatic Theater
1978:
Had prominent film role in "Picassos Aventyr/The Adventures of Picasso"
1982:
Acted in Ingmar Bergman's "Fanny and Alexander"
1984:
Made international debut in a leading role, playing Anna in Bergman's "After the Rehearsal," a part written expressly for her by Bergman
1985:
US TV debut in "Wallenberg: A Hero's Story" (NBC)
1985:
Played Cordelia in the Bergman-directed "King Lear" at Sweden's Royal Dramatic Theater
1988:
Garnered international attention as the lusty Sabina in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being," directed by Philip Kaufman and co-starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Juliette Binoche
1989:
Received a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her role as a Polish immigrant and Holocaust survivor in Paul Mazursky's "Enemies, a Love Story"
1990:
Acted opposite Robert Redford in the large scale would be "Havana"; movie fizzled at the box office
1991:
Starred in the title role in Ingmar Bergman's rendition of Strindberg's "Miss Julie"
1993:
Played a psychiatrist who falls in love with her manic-depressive patient (Richard Gere) in "Mr. Jones"
1993:
Portrayed most extreme character to date; the outrageous hit woman Mona Demarkov in Peter Medak's "Romeo Is Bleeding"
1994:
Emerged with her dignity intact from the moribund erotic costumer "The Night & the Moment"
1997:
Romanced Andy Garcia in "Night Falls on Manhattan," directed by Sidney Lumet
1998:
Was a member of the Festival Jury at Cannes, headed by Martin Scorsese
1998:
Acted with fellow Bergman protege Peter Stormare in the slick Swedish actioner "Hamilton"
1998:
Teamed with Gabriel Byrne to play Claire Danes' parents in Theresa Connelly's "Polish Wedding"
2000:
Led a satanic cult in Roman Polanski's "The Ninth Gate," co-starring Johnny Depp
2000:
Directed by husband Lasse Hallstrom in "Chocolat," playing a kleptomaniac who leaves her abusive husband and finds a new career assisting the recently arrived chocolatiere; reunited on screen with Stormare, Depp and Binoche
2001:
Portrayed Maharet in the film version of Anne Rice's vampire-themed novel "Queen of the Damned"
2001:
Cast as a federal judge whose bodyguard uncovers a plot to overthrow the government in "Ignition"
2002:
Joined the cast of ABC's "Alias," playing the mother of secret agent Sydney Bristow (Jennifer Garner); earned an Emmy (2003) nomination for Supporting Actress
2003:
Cast as Harrison Ford's love interest in the action-comedy "Hollywood Homicide"
2004:
Starred with Kevin Spacey and Ryan Gosling in "The United States of Leland"
2004:
Starred as Anna Paquin's mother in the thriller "Darkness"
2005:
Cast in husband Lasse Hallström's "Casanova," opposite Heath Ledger and Sienna Miller
2007:
Cast in the psychological thriller "Awake" with Hayden Christensen and Jessica Alba
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Royal Dramatic Theatre: -
National Academy of Dramatic Art: - 1976 - 1979

Notes

"The nudity of the body or the nudity of the soul--it's part of the characters. I'm not anxious to show my body, but it's no more big a deal than to show my eyes." --Lena Olin, referring to her nude scene in "The Unbearable Lightness of Being".

"He sees life as black as you can but he sees the humor in it. I never laugh as much as when I watch Strindberg." --Olin quoted in Rolling Stone, March 8, 1990.

"Since Robert Redford is this huge American star, I didn't know what it would be like to work with him. But he has remained so curious about things. He hasn't turned into a stone which I think would be easy if you are pampered as the American stars are." --Olin quoted in The Guardian, January 17, 1991.

About Ingmar Bergman's influence on her: "He taught me that it's important that there be mystery about acting. There should be unpredictability. One shouldn't look at it too closely. You should care only about how to use your body, your voice. He's very practical and he taught me that at an early age." --Olin to David Rensin in Playboy, February 1991.

"I have such a hard time enjoying life, because it's passing all the time, and I just can't relax and let that be. It's like overcoming death every second you live. I think making movies is my way of dealing with the kind of despair that comes from knowing life is passing." --Olin to Peter Hedges in Harpers Bazaar, March 1993.

On the type of roles she looks for: "Every time a woman does something bad or strange on screen, there's always this need to explain, she'll talk about not being able to have babies or being abused or abandoned--because male screenwriters feel guilty about writing a bad woman. But I'm looking for egocentric female characters, women who do strange and awful things, because it's fun--and it's true" --Olin quoted in the Daily News, February 8, 1994.

On frequently being cast as violent, wayward vengeful women, Olin told The Independent (February 16, 2001): "I love that kind of character, because I have access to so much fury. I can bring it on so easily. It comes so naturally to me. I'm a kind person in general, but I've always had access to this anger. ...

"I wasn't very big when I grew up, but I always took pride that no matter what, I can be tougher than anyone else. And I am fearless - I do not care ...

Asked if she still has a violent temper, Olin replied: "Yes, I do. When I feel threatened or afraid, I can lose my temper in an instant. It's a very useful tool for an actor to have that kind of anger, but I can control myself when I have to."

Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Orjan Ramberg. Actor. Swedish; together for five years; separated.
husband:
Lasse Hallstrom. Director. Married on March 18, 1994.

Family close complete family listing

mother:
Britta Olin. Actor. Gave up acting at age 30 to raise her three children; divorced from Stig Olin.
father:
Stig Olin. Actor, director. Appeared in films directed by Ingmar Bergman, beginning with "Hamnsted/Port of Call" (1948) and perhaps most memorably in "The Seventh Seal" (1957); divorced from Britta Olin.
brother:
Mats Olin. Actor.
step-son:
Johan Hallstrom. Born c. 1976.
son:
August Ramberg. Born c. 1986; father, Orjan Ramberg; named after the playwright August Strindberg.
daughter:
Tora Hallstrom. Born c. 1995; father, Lasse Hallstrom.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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