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Ryan O'Neal

Ryan O'Neal

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The Driver... A tres cool mix of noirish grit and slam-bang action this caper film from... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

A Bridge Too... Remembering the glory of D-Day, historians often overlook what happened next. In... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

The List DVD ... A high-class call girl puts a judge in a difficult position when she gives him a... more info $7.98was $7.98 Buy Now

Epoch DVD ... Can one single man save the whole planet? In the made-for-tv-movie "Epoch"... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

What's Up,... What's Up, Doc? joyously recaptures the bubbly style of 1930's screwball... more info $12.98was $12.98 Buy Now

So Fine DVD ... Bobby Fine (Ryan O’Neal) teaches comparative literature at a New England... more info $11.99was $17.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Charles Patrick Ryan O'Neal Died:
Born: April 20, 1941 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: Cast ... actor amateur boxer stuntman lifeguard
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BIOGRAPHY

Though one of the biggest screen actors of the 1970s, Ryan O'Neal saw his career crumble in later decades under the weight of arrests, drug addiction and estrangement from his own children. After playing Rodney Harrington on the popular primetime soap, "Peyton Place" (ABC, 1964-69), O'Neal broke through with an Oscar-nominated turn in the classic tearjerker, "Love Story" (1970). From there, he starred opposite Barbra Streisand in the screwball comedy "What's Up, Doc?" (1972) and was cast by Stanley Kubrick in "Barry Lyndon" (1975). But it was his turn opposite his daughter, a young Tatum O'Neal, in Peter Bogdanovich's "Paper Moon" (1973) that solidified his stardom. But following "Nickelodeon" (1976), "A Bridge Too Far" (1977) and "The Main Event" (1979), his career began to fade, despite a high-profile romance with sex symbol Farrah Fawcett. Though he would star in "Irreconcilable Differences" (1984) and "Tough Guys Don't Dance" (1987), O'Neal saw his workload decline in the 1990s. Not helping matters was being the patriarch of a sadly dysfunctional show business family. In later years, he endured accusations of abuse from his famous children, who themselves made headlines with their addictions, criminal behavior, and suicide attempts. O'Neal survived cancer in 2006, and stood by Fawcett's battle with the disease until her death in 2009. He earned public sympathy throughout her ordeal, but moviegoers was still left to wonder if he would ever be able to recapture the leading man magic he once possessed.

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