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Frederick O'Neal

Frederick O'Neal

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Also Known As: Died: August 25, 1992
Born: August 27, 1905 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Brooksville, Mississippi, USA Profession: actor, union president, author, professor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A veteran black American stage actor who also worked in film and TV, Frederick O'Neal had his greatest impact on the industry as a union leader: he was president emeritus of Actors' Equity Association and Associated Actors and Artistes of America. O'Neal was also a major figure in the black theater in New York City and London, where he founded and organized several theater companies and cultural organizations. The American Negro Theater, which O'Neal co-founded, gave a start to the careers of Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier. O'Neal's feature credits include Elia Kazan's "Pinky" (1949), Richard Brooks' "Something of Value" (1958), "Anna Lucasta" (1958), and Ossie Davis' "Cotton Comes to Harlem" (1970). O'Neal was also a regular on the 1960s cop sitcom, "Car 54, Where Are You?."

A veteran black American stage actor who also worked in film and TV, Frederick O'Neal had his greatest impact on the industry as a union leader: he was president emeritus of Actors' Equity Association and Associated Actors and Artistes of America. O'Neal was also a major figure in the black theater in New York City and London, where he founded and organized several theater companies and cultural organizations. The American Negro Theater, which O'Neal co-founded, gave a start to the careers of Harry Belafonte and Sidney Poitier. O'Neal's feature credits include Elia Kazan's "Pinky" (1949), Richard Brooks' "Something of Value" (1958), "Anna Lucasta" (1958), and Ossie Davis' "Cotton Comes to Harlem" (1970). O'Neal was also a regular on the 1960s cop sitcom, "Car 54, Where Are You?."

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970) Casper
2.
 Strategy of Terror (1969) Jacques Serrac
3.
 Free, White and 21 (1963) Ernie Jones
4.
 The Sins of Rachel Cade (1961) Buderga
5.
 Take a Giant Step (1960) Lem [Scott]
6.
 Anna Lucasta (1958) Frank
7.
 Something of Value (1957) Adam Marenga
8.
 Tarzan's Peril (1951) Bulam
9.
 Pinky (1949) Jake Waters
10.
 Patriots, The (1963) Jupiter
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1944:
Debuted on Broadway in Philip Yordan's "Anna Lucasta" in the role of Frank
1975:
Inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame
1947:
Recreated the role again in a production at His Majesty's Theater in London
1945:
Recreated the role of Frank in a London production of "Anna Lucasta"
1940:
Co-founded the American Negro Theater
1927:
Made first professional stage appearance, in St. Louis
1920:
Moved with his family from Mississippi to St Louis MO
1958:
Recreated the role of Frank in the film version of "Anna Lucasta" starring Eartha Kitt and Sammy Davis Jr
1963:
Starred in melodrama entitled "Free, White, and 21"
1962:
Appeared as a series regular as Officer Wallace on the sitcom, "Car 54, Where Are You?"
:
Appeared in several productions of the American Negro Theater
1948:
Initiated and helped organize the British Negro Theater
1927:
Organized the Aldridge Players, a community theater
:
Performed at the Civic Repertory Theater
1990:
Received a special tribute from the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame
:
Served in the US military during World War II
1957:
Appeared as Moses in the NBC-TV version of "The Green Pastures" for the "Hallmark Hall of Fame"
1949:
Made feature debut as Jake Walters in Elia Kazan's "Pinky"
1936:
Moved to New York City
:
Served as president of Actors' Equity Association
:
Served as president of the Associated Actors and Artistes
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

American Theatre Wing: New York, New York -

Notes

O'Neal wrote several feature articles for periodicals and newspapers. He wrote "The Negro in American Theater" for the US Information Service.

He was vice president and a executive council member of the AFL-CIO (1969-88)

He was chairman of the AFL-CIO Civil Rights Committee.

O'Neal was president of the Catholic Interracial Council.

He was a chairman and organizer of the Harlem Cultural Council.

O'Neal was vice president of the Catholic Actors' Guild.

He served on the advisory board of the Actors' Fund of America.

O'Neal was a visiting professor at Southern Illinois University.

O'Neal was a visiting professor at Clark College in Atlanta, GA.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Charlotte Talbot Hainey. Survived him.

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