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Bruce Beresford

Bruce Beresford

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: August 16, 1940 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Australia Profession: director, screenwriter, producer, editor, cameraman, factory worker, teacher

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Perhaps the least lionized of the Australian New Wave filmmakers, Bruce Beresford has developed a reputation for drawing extraordinary performances from his actors, as well as enjoying great success making stage plays work on film. Much-acclaimed for historical dramas of social and moral conflict, he surprisingly first made his name with low comedy, delighting in juvenile scatology that horrified critics while regaling the Australian public. Though he had always wanted to make films, he had to leave his native country to do so, and when England proved inimical, he applied for and got a job as a film editor (and sometime cameraman) in Nigeria, remaining there until the Nigerian civil war broke out in 1967. Returning to England, he secured a position as a films officer for the Production Board of the British Film Institute, but on a visit to Australia in 1971, he found its film community in a state of high excitement over the formation of the Australian Film Commission. Within a matter of weeks he was back in Sydney, ready for action. Beresford convinced the Commission that economic success was far more important than cultural prestige during the incipient stage of their venture and secured backing for...

Perhaps the least lionized of the Australian New Wave filmmakers, Bruce Beresford has developed a reputation for drawing extraordinary performances from his actors, as well as enjoying great success making stage plays work on film. Much-acclaimed for historical dramas of social and moral conflict, he surprisingly first made his name with low comedy, delighting in juvenile scatology that horrified critics while regaling the Australian public. Though he had always wanted to make films, he had to leave his native country to do so, and when England proved inimical, he applied for and got a job as a film editor (and sometime cameraman) in Nigeria, remaining there until the Nigerian civil war broke out in 1967. Returning to England, he secured a position as a films officer for the Production Board of the British Film Institute, but on a visit to Australia in 1971, he found its film community in a state of high excitement over the formation of the Australian Film Commission. Within a matter of weeks he was back in Sydney, ready for action.

Beresford convinced the Commission that economic success was far more important than cultural prestige during the incipient stage of their venture and secured backing for his first feature, "The Adventures of Barry McKenzie" (1972). Co-written with star Barry Humphries, who had created the character in a comic strip in the British satirical magazine PRIVATE EYE, the film presented a gross caricature of a beer-swilling, sex-crazed Aussie innocent on his first visit to England, accompanied by his very proper Aunt Edna (Humphries in drag). A shot in the arm to the fledgling industry, it pigeonholed Beresford as "that lout who makes those low comedies," and he turned to TV to rehabilitate his image, beginning his love affair with historical drama. He directed two feature-length films, "Poor Fella Me" (1973, which he also scripted), about the destruction of the Aboriginal culture at the hands of the white man, and "The Wreck of the Batavia" (1974), telling the story of a religious fanatic's murderous control over a shipload of castaways on the West Australian coast in 1629.

After the broad strokes of the sequel "Barry McKenzie Holds His Own" (1974) and the even more disreputable "Side by Side" (1975), Beresford got his first chance to adapt a successful stage play to the screen. Though five other directors had passed on "Don's Party" (1976), assessing the material as hopelessly stage bound, he recognized the virtue in not opening up David Williamson's play. The grim comedy-drama about a group of chums whose friendly veneer vanishes in the drunken wake that ensues after national election results run counter to expectations was a big box office success, "The Getting of Wisdom" (1977) brought more attention outside Australia, displaying his sure handling of actors and confident recreation of the stuffy world of Victorian Melbourne, but he faltered with "The Money Movers" (1978), a caper film which failed commercially, despite a cast peopled with many popular Australian TV actors.

Inspired by Kenneth Ross' play about the turn-of-the-century cause celebre once dubbed Britain's Dreyfus Case, Beresford brought his own meticulous research to "Breaker Morant" (1980), which became the greatest box-office success in the history of the Australian cinema (to that time) and earned the Australian Film Institute's Best Film award and an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay (to which the director had contributed). The powerful account of a true incident of sanctioned murder during the Boer War evoked memories of My Lai, not to mention Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" (1957), and though the three individuals tried for their atrocities were clearly guilty, the film also made it abundantly clear that they were "Scapegoats of Empire", the title of an account written by George Witton, the only one of the three to escape the firing squad. 1980 also saw him team with Williamson again, adapting his play "The Club" about the power struggles within a major Australian soccer team. Reversing his "hands off" approach applied to "Don's Party", he attempted to expand "The Club", but most critics felt his tampering dissipated the dramatic power of the play.

The enormous success of "Breaker Morant" brought Beresford many offers to direct in the United States, and he finally settled on "Tender Mercies" (1982), a subtle, superbly realized drama scripted by Horton Foote, the first of several projects which would immerse him in the culture of the American South. Robert Duvall won the Best Actor Oscar as an alcoholic country singer who finds the inspiration to put his life back together when he meets an attractive young widow and her little boy, and Beresford garnered an Academy Award nomination for his directing. After returning to Australia to helm "The Fringe Dwellers", a study of the racism confronting aborigines, he found much less success with his second US offering, the vapid, large-scale rendering of the life of "King David" (both 1985), though critics noted his attempt to infuse life into the moribund genre of religious spectacle without praising the effort. He fared better with the much smaller-scaled "Crimes of the Heart" (1986), adapted from the play by Beth Henley and featuring fine performances from Diane Keaton, Jessica Lange and Sissy Spacek as three slightly off-center Southern sisters.

Following the uninspired action romance "Her Alibi", Beresford was back in top form with the Oscar-winning (Best Picture) adaptation of Alfred Uhry's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "Driving Miss Daisy" (both 1989), scripted by the playwright. A sensitive portrait of an aging Southern woman (Jessica Tandy in an Oscar-winning turn) and her gently wise black chauffeur (Morgan Freeman), it raked in a ton of money on its small investment and reinforced the director's reputation for eliciting superb performances in intense, small-scale drama. Amazingly, the Academy failed to recognize Beresford with an Oscar nod, perhaps under the mistaken assumption that the movie directed itself. Refusing to go Hollywood, he next helmed "Mr. Johnson" (1990), an adaptation of a Joyce Carey novel set in 1923 Africa, which drew on his own experience of Africa during the 60s, and followed with the haunting, graphically violent "Black Robe" (1991), a much more realistic depiction of Indian life than "Dances with Wolves" (1990). Set in mid-17th Century Canada and devoid of revisionist apologies, "Black Robe" told the bleak story of the first contact of the Huron Indians with the Jesuit missionaries who would ultimately betray them to their enemies.

Beresford attempted to recreate the depth and intimacy of his best work with the "Daisy" producing team of Richard and Lili Fini Zanuck in "Rich in Love" (1993) but didn't quite succeed in weaving another evocative Southern tale, though there were many fine moments and great performances by the likes of Albert Finney and Kathryn Erbe in the leading femme role. He continued his interest in the clash between "native" cultures and the forces of "civilization" that invade them in a more satirical vein with "A Good Man in Africa" (1994), combining sexual intrigue and political corruption, but to mixed reviews. He also helmed that year's well-made, but lackluster thriller "Silent Fall", featuring Richard Dreyfuss as a psychiatrist working with an autistic child who witnessed a murder. Though his next venture, "Last Dance" (1996), suffered by comparison with the similarly-themed "Dead Man Walking" from the year before, it boasted a strong central performance by Sharon Stone in the deglamorized role of convicted murderess and represented the director's best outing in awhile.

Hearing a tape recording of a musical choir recreating a concert that took place in a Japanese prison camp for women during World War II gave Beresford the idea for "Paradise Road" (1997), which he wrote as well as directed. This lushly-filmed, true account of a group of European women who formed a choir to cope with their confinement was certainly inspiring and its performances moving but lacked the bite and requisite story arc to make a completely satisfying movie. Beresford then returned to the land of the thriller for "Double Jeopardy" (1999), a movie as full of holes as Swiss cheese, which despite its deficiencies took in more than $65 million in its first three weeks. A patch-work pastiche packaged as a quasi-remake of "The Fugitive" (complete with arguably Tommy Lee Jones' best work since that pic), it was not one of the director's better efforts, but its well-acted hokum (particularly the fierce turn by star Ashley Judd) appeased the bottom line and left Beresford free to flex his artistic muscles helming productions of operas like "The Crucible" (1999, based on the Arthur Miller play) and "Rigoletto" (2000).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

3.
5.
  Evelyn (2002) Director
6.
  Bride of the Wind (2001) Director
7.
  Double Jeopardy (1999) Director
8.
  Paradise Road (1997) Director
9.
  Last Dance (1996) Director
10.
  Silent Fall (1994) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1959:
Offered scholarship to attend USC but couldn't raise airfare
:
Gained some experience as a film trainee with the Australian Broadcasting Commission
1962:
Sailed for England (a six-week journey) on the day of his graduation from university; once there, roomed with future critic-poet Clive James
:
Moved to London to get into English film industry; blocked by unions
1964:
Worked as a film editor in East Nigeria; left at outbreak of Nigerian Civil War
:
Worked in administrative capacity with Production Board of the British Film Institute, sometimes serving as photographer or editor; directed shorts on Roy Lichtenstein, Rene Magritte, and the sculpture of Picasso and Barbara Hepworth, among others
1971:
Returned to Australia
1972:
Feature co-writing (with Barry Humphries) and directing debut, "The Adventures of Barry McKenzie"
1973:
Turned to Australian TV, directing two feature-length, historical films, "Poor Fella Me" (also teleplay writer) about the destruction of Australian aborigines under white rule, and "The Wreck of the Batavia," telling the tale of Jeronimus Corneliusz, a religious fanatic who became the murderous dictator of a shipload of castaways on the West Australian coast
1974:
First feature as producer (also co-wrote with Humphries and directed), "Barry McKenzie Holds His Own"
1975:
Wrote and directed "Side by Side," a "staggeringly crass" musical that starred Humphries
1976:
First commercial and critical success, "Don's Party"; first collaboration with playwright David Williamson
1977:
Fourth film with Humphries (again only acting), "The Getting of Wisdom", garnered some international attention
1980:
"Breaker Morant," the greatest box-office success to that time of the Australian cinema earned the Best Film award from the Australian Film Institute and an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay
1980:
Reteamed with Williamson in "The Club"
1982:
U.S. directorial debut, "Tender Mercies"; garnered an Academy Award nomination as Best Director
1985:
Directed first opera "La Fancicella del West" at Spoleto USA Festival
1986:
Helmed "Crimes of the Heart," adapted from Beth Henley's play; reportedly took large pay cut (as did actresses Diane Keaton, Sissy Spacek, and Jessica Lange) to ensure film was made
1987:
Directed the "Die Tote Stadt" segment of the opera anthology "Aria"
1989:
Signed with HISK Productions in L.A. to direct TV commercials
1989:
Helmed the Oscar-winning Best Picture "Driving Miss Daisy," adapted from Alfred Uhry's Pulitzer Prize-winning play; was ironically not nominated for Best Director
1991:
Directed the award-winning historical "Black Robe" about Jesuit missionaries in Canada
1991:
First screenplay for an American feature, "Mister Johnson"; adapted from the Joyce Carey novel and also directed
1993:
Reteamed with "Daisy" producing team of Richard and Lili Fini Zanuck for "Rich in Love"
1994:
Co-produced and directed "A Good Man in Africa"
1995:
Executive produced and scripted Showtime adaptation of Sam Shepard's "Curse of the Starving Class" (did not direct); script changed considerably from the time it was finished until the time it premiered, prompting Beresford to say, "I know now why writers get so angry" (from <i>Written By</i>, June 1997)
1997:
Wrote and directed "Paradise Road" about female prisoners held captive during WWII in Singapore
1998:
Announced as director of the TV adaptation of Alfred Uhry's play "The Last Night of the Ballyhoo" (unproduced as of fall 1999)
1999:
Helmed the stage opera based on Arthur Miller's "The Crucible"
1999:
Directed "Double Jeopardy," a thriller starring Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones that became a surprise box office hit
1999:
Co-directed (with Geoff Burton) and produced "Sydney: A Story of a City," a 41-minute docudrama in the large screen IMAX format; backed by the Sydney City Council, this breathtaking and unapologetic piece of propaganda seductively sold Sydney, the home of the 2000 Olympic Games
2000:
Staged Los Angles Opera production of "Rigoletto"
2000:
Produced and directed the Bravo series "Aria & Pasta"
2003:
Directed Antonio Banderas in the HBO biopic "And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself"
2006:
Helmed crime thriller "The Contract"; re-teamed with "Driving Miss Daisy" star Morgan Freeman
2009:
Directed the biographical drama "Mao's Last Dancer" based on the autobiography by Li Cunxin
2012:
Directed Jane Fonda and Catherine Keener in the comedy-drama "Peace, Love, & Misunderstanding"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Sydney: Sydney , New South Wales - 1962

Notes

On his ability to portray the American South so well in movies: "Well, I think the only reason for that is that I've come across a number of good Southern writers. And they write . . . they seem to have this flair of someone like Tennessee Williams. Not that they write like him, but there seems to be a wonderful feeling for language. Beth Henley, Josephine [Humphreys], Horton Foote, Alfred Uhry--they all write in a different style, but they've all got a great ear.

"I mean, there's plaenty of Northern writers like that, too, I guess, but I just haven't heard 'em! See, David Mamet, who everyone's telling me writes great dialogue, just writes people saying 'Fuck, fuck, fuck' all the time--I don't think it's very good dialogue. It's boring!" --Bruce Beresford quoted in Written By, June 1997

"I've always been interested in different cultures and different stratas of society other than the one I grew up in. I'll make one [movie] on one group and then, having said everything I've got to say on the subject, move onto something different and refresshing. I remember, as a kid, my favorite reading used to be atlases. I used to pick out countries at random, think that I'd love to go see what people do in that place and how they behave. By now, I've been to most of them." --Beresford to Bob Strauss in The Boston Globe, September 19, 1999

On his part in Australia's cinematic blossoming of the 1970s: "It was exciting being a part of that group. There's a marvelous moment whan you see your own culture put up on-screen, which had never happened before in Australia. There'd been a few, very self-conscious things that they used to load up with kangaroos and like that, but nothing measurable in real terms. But suddenly, there were all these films that examined Australian life; and the film renaissance put Australia on the global map and made tourism the country's number-one industry." --Beresford quoted in The Boston Globe, September 19, 1999

"In the old days--only a couple of years ago--you'd make a film, show the studio the cut, they'd look at it and comment and then go away. It was often useful because their comments were quite spontaneous--they were comments that an average audience would make, comments like, 'It's too slow there,' or 'I didn't quite understand that.'

"Now they all get videocassettes, they take it home and then not only run it back and forth as many times as they like, they can actually do their own little edits on it . . ." --From The New York Times, April 23, 1997

About working on "Last Dance": "Disney would call and they'd say, 'We think you should do so-and-so.' And I'd say, 'OK, you told me this yesterday.' And an hour later someone else would call, that afternoon someone else would call, the next morning comeone would call, all with the same thing. It never stopped!

"Every day there were pages and pages, and they were doing all their cuts all the time. And a few times I just said to them, 'Look, either I'll cut the film or you'll cut the film, but we both can't cut the film because it'll end up a mess.'

"I mean, I've kept all the notes and sent them to the National Library in Australia. I said: 'I want you to keep all these notes. They're going to be very interesting to some historian in the future.'" --From The New York Times, April 23, 1997

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Rhoisin Beresford. Graphic designer. Designed set for husband's "Don's Party" (1976); shared screenplay credit with husband on "The Fringe Dwellers" (1985).
wife:
Virginia Beresford. Filmmaker, screenwriter. Sister of director John Duigan; married in 1985.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Leslie Beresford. Salesman.
mother:
Lona Beresford.
brother-in-law:
John Duigan. Director, screenwriter.
son:
Benjamin Beresford. Mother, Rhoisin Harrison; has worked in various capacities (e.g., production assistant, property assistant) on several of father's films.
son:
Adam Beresford. Mother, Rhoisin Harrison; was a camera production assistant on father's "Silent Fall" (1994).
daughter:
Cordelia Beresford. Mother, Rhoisin Harrison; acted in "The Getting of Wisdom" (1977) and "Black Robe" (1991).
child:
Trilby Beresford. Mother, Virginia Duigan.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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