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Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson

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Fighting with Anger ... Willie Nelson, Kelli Fleming, Jonathan Boatwright. When an old hit man hires a... more info $7.95was $9.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: William Hugh Nelson Died:
Born: April 30, 1933 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Abbott, Texas, USA Profession: singer, songwriter, producer, actor, disc jockey, encyclopedia salesman (sold door to door)

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

orts, as well as testimony before Congress, helped to pass the Agricultural Credit Act of 1987, which saved family farms from epidemic foreclosures that were occurring at that time.But the bottom dropped out for Nelson in the early 1990s. The IRS presented him with a bill for some $32 million in unpaid taxes, one of the largest debts ever incurred by an individual. Nelson was forced sell most of his belongings, including his home, his recording studio and many of his gold records to pay down the fee, and later released The IRS Tapes: Who¿ll Buy My Memories, a compilation album of outtakes and demos, to fend off the government. While contending with the loss of his entire fortune, Nelson also suffered a personal setback when his son, Billy, committed suicide in 1991. Nelson eventually paid off his government debt with the help of a lawsuit against his accounting firm, Price Waterhouse, who settled for an undisclosed sum.In 1993, he returned to recording with Across the Borderline, an eclectic mix of original material and cover songs that was his first to place on both the country and pop charts since 1985. Its critical success kicked off a steady string of releases and tours that re-established him as...

orts, as well as testimony before Congress, helped to pass the Agricultural Credit Act of 1987, which saved family farms from epidemic foreclosures that were occurring at that time.

But the bottom dropped out for Nelson in the early 1990s. The IRS presented him with a bill for some $32 million in unpaid taxes, one of the largest debts ever incurred by an individual. Nelson was forced sell most of his belongings, including his home, his recording studio and many of his gold records to pay down the fee, and later released The IRS Tapes: Who¿ll Buy My Memories, a compilation album of outtakes and demos, to fend off the government. While contending with the loss of his entire fortune, Nelson also suffered a personal setback when his son, Billy, committed suicide in 1991. Nelson eventually paid off his government debt with the help of a lawsuit against his accounting firm, Price Waterhouse, who settled for an undisclosed sum.

In 1993, he returned to recording with Across the Borderline, an eclectic mix of original material and cover songs that was his first to place on both the country and pop charts since 1985. Its critical success kicked off a steady string of releases and tours that re-established him as a vital and respected force in country music; his 1993 induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame, Kennedy Center Honors in 1998, and Lifetime Achievement Award from the Grammys in 1999 cemented his status as living legend. Despite his newly minted status as country¿s elder statesman, he refused to fall back on his older material. Instead, he returned to the experimental vibe of his best work from the 1970s, dabbling in blues with Milk Cow Blues (2000); standards with The Rainbow Connection (2001); collaborations with old friends like Ray Price with Run That By Me One More Time (2003) and alt-country hero Ryan Adams with Songbird (2006); jazz with Two Men with the Blues (2008); and even reggae with Countryman (2005). His 70th birthday was celebrated with the pomp and affection granted to a beloved national icon.

In addition to his prolific music career and forays into acting, Nelson was an outspoken activist for a number of liberal-minded causes. He served on the advisory board for the National Organizations for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) and formed Willie Nelson Biodiesel to promote a bio-fuel at truck stops. He was also a passionate defender of animal rights, campaigning for passage of the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act and against cruelty to calves raised by major dairy corporations to produce milk. He also supported several outsider political candidates, including eccentric songwriter-turned-mystery author Kinky Friedman in his 2006 bid for governor of Texas, and Dennis Kucinich¿s campaign for the Presidency in 2004.

Nelson continued to act through the years, though the roles were greatly reduced in terms of dramatic impact. Instead, Nelson played variations on his own persona; in Barry Levinson¿s "Wag the Dog" (1997), Nelson played a semi-cameo as himself, crafting a patriotic song to assist in the Hollywood spin-doctoring of a political scandal. He was the Historian Smoker, who recounted marijuana usage through the ages in the pot comedy "Half Baked" (1998), then played himself as a competitive weed smoker in the broad comedy "Beerfest" (2006). However, he was the only possible choice to play the congenial Uncle Jesse in the big-screen version of "The Dukes of Hazzard" (2005), which even allowed him to enjoy some romantic moments with co-star Lynda Carter. In 2006, he appeared in a feature film based on "Beer for My Horses," a chart-topping duet with country artist Toby Keith. That same year, he released the single "Cowboys Are Frequently, Secretly Fond of Each Other," a gently comic Western waltz that satirized the similarities between cowboys and the gay community. The single, released in the wake of "Brokeback Mountain" (2006), was his highest charting solo release since "To All the Girls I¿ve Loved Before" in 1984. In 2010, he generated worldwide press when he clipped his back-length hair braid, which he¿d cultivated since the 1970s.ening to Western swing and traditional blues alongside older establishment types, or rock fans enjoying jazz acts. Nelson took inspiration from this freedom of choice, and returned to the music scene with renewed vigor. He also cast off the clean-cut, well-scrubbed Nashville look in favor of a more counterculture aesthetic and began displaying a sizable appetite for marijuana. His music reflected this "outlaw" vibe as well, mixing jazz and swing with pre-World War II country and his own new material, which combined a gentle world-weariness and puckishly clever lyrics.

After signing with Atlantic in 1973, Nelson released a string of popular and critically acclaimed records that pushed the boundaries of country music. 1974¿s Phases and Stages was a concept album that detailed the collapse of a marriage, while The Red-Headed Stranger (1975) was a spare, gorgeous song-poem LP. The latter proved to be his breakthrough release, yielding his first No. 1 single, a cover of "Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain." Its success was the opening salvo in a series of commercial and critical hits throughout the 1970s and 1980s that put Nelson at the top of the country music heap. Wanted! The Outlaws (1976) was a compilation of previously released material by Nelson and like-minded performers Waylon Jennings, Jessi Colter and Tompall Glaser that became the first country music album to sell a million copies, while Waylon and Willie, a collaboration with Jennings, produced the single "Mama Don¿t Let Your Babies Grow Up to be Cowboys," which earned them a Grammy. Ever the individualist, Nelson even tackled an album of standards, which industry wags dubbed a failure before it was completed. But the resulting LP, Stardust (1978), was a colossal hit that held a spot on the Billboard charts for over a decade, while establishing Nelson as one of the most versatile artists in the business.

In 1979, Nelson made his acting debut as the cynical manager of Robert Redford¿s ex-rodeo star in Sydney Pollack¿s "The Electric Horseman," to which he also contributed five songs to its soundtrack. His first starring role came a year later with Jerry Schatzberg¿s "Honeysuckle Rose" (1980), with Nelson as a veteran country singer who returns to touring against the wishes of his wife (Dyan Cannon). Though only a modest success, Nelson gave a winning performance in a role that reflected his own life, and the picture produced "On the Road Again," a signature tune for the singer, as well as an Academy Award nominee for Best Song. An understated supporting turn as an aging con in Michael Mann¿s "Thief" (1981) preceded one of his best screen roles as the aging but still dangerous titular gunman in the Western "Barbarosa" (1982), a terrific latter-day example of the genre, as well as a rueful meditation on the pitfalls of mythologizing.

Nelson¿s music career remained exceptionally fruitful during this period as well. He scored a Top Five crossover hit on the pop charts with a 1982 cover of Elvis Presley¿s "Always On My Mind," then struck gold with two collaborations with Jennings, 1982¿s WWII and 1983¿s Take It To the Limit. A third duet album, Poncho and Lefty (1983) with Merle Haggard, also followed suit. He then formed a supergroup with Jennings, Johnny Cash and Kris Kristofferson called The Highwaymen, whose 1985 debut album yielded a No. 1 single with "Highwayman." Perhaps his most unlikely success during this period was 1984¿s "To All the Girls I¿ve Loved Before," a duet with Latin crooner Julio Iglesias that reached No. 5 on the pop charts. The following year, he teamed with Neil Young and John Mellencamp to launch Farm Aid, an annual benefit concert supporting family farmers in the United States. Their eff

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Wild Bunch, The (2017)
2.
 Lost In London (2017)
3.
 Zoolander 2 (2016)
5.
 When Angels Sing (2013)
6.
7.
8.
 Swing Vote (2008)
9.
10.
 Surfer, Dude (2008)
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised by his paternal gradparents after parents' divorce
1937:
First public performance, recited a poem at a church picnic at age four
1943:
Joined first band, John Raycjeck's Bohemian Polka Band
1956:
Released first album, the self-financed <i>No Place for Me</i>; sold over the radio in Vancouver, Washington
:
Moved to Texas in the late 1950s; settled in Houston and worked as a disc jockey
:
Moved to Nashville
1961:
Had first success as a songwriter with the Patsy Cline song, "Crazy"
1962:
Duets with second wife Shirley Collie hit the charts
1964:
Debuted at the Grand Old Opry (November 28)
1970:
Moved from Nashville back to Texas after his Tennessee home was destroyed in a fire
1973:
Released what is considered breakthrough album, <i>Shotgun Willie</i>
1975:
Became established star with release of <i>Red Headed Stranger</i> album
1979:
Made feature film acting debut in "The Electric Horseman"
1980:
In the mid-1980s, Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, and Johnny Cash formed a group called The Highwaymen
1980:
First leading role in a film, "Honeysuckle Rose"; also wrote songs and music; earned Oscar nomination for Best Song for "On the Road Again"
1982:
Made TV acting debut in the docudrama, "Coming Out of the Ice"
1983:
Appeared in the documentary, "Hells Angels Forever"
1986:
First credit as producer, "Red-Headed Stranger"
1990:
Seven-year dispute with the IRS ended with IRS agents seizing Nelson's possessions (including the Pedernales Country Club and Recording Studio near Austin TX and his 44-acre Dripping Springs ranch, as well as properties in four other states and his instruments, recordings and memorabilia) in November, claiming he owed $16.7 million in back taxes, penalties and interest
1993:
Released <i>Across the Borderline</i>, with guests Bob Dylan, Sinéad O'Connor, David Crosby, Bonnie Raitt, Kris Kristofferson and Paul Simon
1996:
Featured on the Beach Boys' now out-of-print album <i>Stars and Stripes Vol. 1</i>, singing a cover of their 1964 song "The Warmth of the Sun"
1998:
Had a cameo in "Half Baked" as an elderly 'Historian Smoker'
2004:
Released the album, <i>Outlaws & Angels</i>; earned two Grammy nominations
2005:
Cast as Uncle Jesse in the big-screen version of "The Dukes of Hazzard" based on the 1970's hit show
2006:
Released <i>You Don't Know Me: The Songs of Cindy Walker</i>, featuring songs written by the late Cindy Walker; earned a Grammy nomination for Best Country Album
2007:
Second collaboration with Dukes' co-star Jessica Simpson, "Blonde Ambition"
2008:
Appeared in the comedy "Surfer, Dude" starring Matthew McConaughey
2009:
Earned three Grammy nominations, including one for his album, <i>Willie and the Wheel</i>, and one for his collaboration with Norah Jones, "Baby, It's Cold Outside"
2010:
Earned a Grammy nomination for the album <i>Country Music</i>
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Notes

Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in June 2001.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Martha Matthews. Carhop. Full-blooded Cherokee; married in 1952; divorced in 1962; died in December 1989.
wife:
Shirley Collie. Singer. Recorded with Nelson; married c. 1962; divorced.
wife:
Connie Nelson. Married in the early 1970s; divorced.
wife:
Annie D'Angelo. Makeup artist. Married on September 16, 1991 in Dallas; fourth wife; met on set of "Red Headed Stranger" (1986); couple has two sons.
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Family close complete family listing

father:
Ira Nelson. Musician.
mother:
Myrle Nelson.
sister:
Bobby Lee Nelson.
daughter:
Lana Nelson. Nelson's business manager. Born in 1953; mother, Martha Matthews; mother of four.
daughter:
Susie Nelson. Singer. Born in 1956; mother, Martha Matthews.
son:
Billy Nelson. Sometime musician. Born c. 1958, committed suicide by hanging himself on December 25, 1991 in Nashville, Tennessee; mother, Martha Matthews; married once to Janet Caldwell and had recently separated before his suicide; had undergone a 30-day hospital program for alcohol abuse in 1990.
daughter:
Paula Nelson. Born in 1969.
daughter:
Amy Nelson. Born in 1973.
son:
Lukas Autry Nelson. Born in 1989; mother, Annie D'Angelo.
son:
Jacob Micah Nelson. Born in 1990; mother, Annie D'Angelo.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Willie: An Autobiography"
"The Facts of Life and Other Dirty Jokes" Random House

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