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Overview for Ronald Neame
Ronald Neame

Ronald Neame

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Also Known As: Died: June 16, 2010
Born: April 23, 1911 Cause of Death: Natural causes/complications from fall
Birth Place: London, England, GB Profession: Director ...
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1923:
After father's death, dropped out of school
:
Found employment as an office boy in an oil company
1927:
Joined British International Pictures as a messenger and general assistant
1928:
Began career as an assistant cameraman at Elstree Studios
:
Left the film industry briefly to set up business as a photographer
1929:
Feature debut, worked as assistant cameraman on "Blackmail", directed by Alfred Hitchcock
1935:
Debut as director of photography, "Drake of England/Drake the Pirate"; originally hired as camera operator then assumsed cinematography duties when Claude Friese-Greene left the production
:
Shot several productions including "Once in a Million/Weekend Millionaire", "Brief Ecstasy/Dangerous Secrets", "Penny Paradise" and "Trouble Brewing"
1941:
Served as director of photography on "Major Barbara". directed by Gabriel Pascal
1942:
Shot the Powell-Pressburger film "...One of Our Aircraft Is Missing"
1942:
Began association with David Lean as cinematographer on "In Which We Serve"
1945:
With Lean, co-wrote the film adaptation of Noel Coward's play "Blithe Spirit"; also served as cinematographer
1946:
Co-wrote script and did uncredited photography on "Great Expectations", directed by Lean
1947:
Feature directorial debut, "Take My Life"
1948:
Was a producer on Lean's film version of "Oliver Twist"
1952:
Directed the comedy "The Card/The Promoter", starring Alec Guinness as a resourceful young man out to climb the ladders of society
1956:
Helmed the engaging spy thriller "The Man Who Never Was"
1958:
Reunited with Guinness (who scripted as well as starred) for "The Horse's Mouth", based on Joyce Cary's novel about an extravagantly talented, sometimes monstrously behaved artist
1960:
Directed what is arguably his best film, "Tunes of Glory", focusing on the clash between two Scottish military men (played by Guinness and John Mills)
1963:
Helmed the Judy Garland vehicle "I Could Go On Singing"
1964:
Directed the film version of the stage play "The Chalk Garden", featuring Edith Evans in an Oscar-nominated performance
1966:
Was responsible for the studio scenes (shot in Rome) for the film "A Man Could Get Killed"
1966:
Helmed the delightful caper flick "Gambit", starring Michael Caine and Shirley MacLaine
1968:
Did uncredited direction on "Prudence and the Pill"; replaced Fielder Cook
1969:
Helmed the film version of the hit play "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie"; star Maggie Smith earned her first Oscar
1970:
Directed the musical feature "Scrooge", adapted from the Dickens' classic "A Christmas Carol"
1972:
Enjoyed commercial success with the all-star, disaster-themed movie "The Poseidon Adventure"
1974:
Directed the film adaptation of the Frederic Forsythe spy novel "The Odessa File"
1979:
Returned to disaster-themed popcorn flicks with the so-so "Meteor"
1980:
Guided the Walter Matthau-Glenda Jackson comedy "Hopscotch"
1981:
Reunited with Matthau for the comedy-drama "First Monday in October", about the first female Supreme Court justice
1986:
Final feature-length film, the comedy "Foreign Body"
1990:
Co-wrote and directed the promotional featurette "The Magic Balloon"

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