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Also Known As: Francis Phillip Wupperman, Frank Wupperman Died: September 18, 1949
Born: June 1, 1890 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain," exclaimed beloved character actor Frank Morgan during a key moment in "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) and his beautifully conveyed expression of embarrassment and desperation perfectly exemplified the capacity he displayed in so much of his work. He first established himself on stage, making regular appearances on Broadway in such major productions as "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1926-27) and "The Band Wagon" (1931-32). Morgan was already featured in movies by that point, but really hit his stride in the 1930s, earning an Academy Award nomination for "The Affairs of Cellini" (1934) and distinguishing himself in notable pictures like "The Good Fairy" (1935) and "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936). His most famous screen credit, however, was the musical/fantasy classic "The Wizard of Oz" (1939), where he was wonderfully memorable in no less than five roles. He displayed excellent dramatic form in "The Shop Around the Corner" (1940) and "The Mortal Storm" (1940), and a second Oscar nomination followed for "Tortilla Flat" (1942). MGM was so pleased with the consistency of Morgan's vibrant and delightful performances that he was with the company from the early 1930s...

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain," exclaimed beloved character actor Frank Morgan during a key moment in "The Wizard of Oz" (1939) and his beautifully conveyed expression of embarrassment and desperation perfectly exemplified the capacity he displayed in so much of his work. He first established himself on stage, making regular appearances on Broadway in such major productions as "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1926-27) and "The Band Wagon" (1931-32). Morgan was already featured in movies by that point, but really hit his stride in the 1930s, earning an Academy Award nomination for "The Affairs of Cellini" (1934) and distinguishing himself in notable pictures like "The Good Fairy" (1935) and "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936). His most famous screen credit, however, was the musical/fantasy classic "The Wizard of Oz" (1939), where he was wonderfully memorable in no less than five roles. He displayed excellent dramatic form in "The Shop Around the Corner" (1940) and "The Mortal Storm" (1940), and a second Oscar nomination followed for "Tortilla Flat" (1942). MGM was so pleased with the consistency of Morgan's vibrant and delightful performances that he was with the company from the early 1930s right up until his premature death in 1949. Specializing in characters that were usually a bit befuddled and flustered, but motivated by honorable intentions, Morgan endeared himself to audiences everywhere and remained one of Hollywood's most beloved supporting players long after his passing.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Key to the City (1950) Duggan
3.
 Any Number Can Play (1949) Jim Kurstyn
4.
 The Stratton Story (1949) Barney Wile
5.
 The Great Sinner (1949) Aristide Pitard
6.
 Summer Holiday (1948) Uncle Sid
7.
 The Three Musketeers (1948) King Louis XVIII
8.
 Green Dolphin Street (1947) Dr. Edmond Ozanne
9.
 Courage of Lassie (1946) Harry MacBain
10.
 Lady Luck (1946) William ["Gramps"] Audrey
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Family close complete family listing

brother:
Ralph Morgan. Actor.

Contributions

theladyeve ( 2008-12-09 )

Source: not available

Frank Morgan (June 1, 1890 – September 18, 1949) was born Francis Phillip Wuppermann in New York City into a wealthy family that distributed Angostura bitters. He attended Cornell University but eventually followed his brother Ralph Morgan into show business. Frank Morgan appeared on the stage and in theaters before breaking into film. His first movie was “The Suspect” in 1916. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor in 1934 for “The Affairs of Cellini,” and was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for “Tortilla Flat” in 1942. Morgan is best known for his performance in the beloved 1939 classic, “The Wizard of Oz.” He played several roles in the film including the Wizard of Oz. Others of his memorable films included “The Shop Around the Corner,” The Human Comedy,” and “The Mortal Storm.” Morgan died following a heart attack in 1949 at the age of 59. At the time, he was in the early stages of filming “Annie Get Your Gun” (in the role of Buffalo Bill Cody) and was replaced by Louis Calhern.

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