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Gerald Mohr

Gerald Mohr

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  • Someone special.

    • Linda C Wood
    • 2009-12-06

    I first saw Gerald Mohr in the late 50s or early 60s when he guest starred in many of the very best TV Westerns of the era - Maverick, Cheyenne, Bronco, Outlaws and many, many more. Tall, dark and handsome with a perfect speaking voice, he was easily the most attractive bad man of the time! And it was only when I started researching his career that I discovered just how special he was. From being a cub news reporter on radio, he joined Orson Welles' Mercury Theatre company and performed for Welles both on stage and in many radio plays. He soon became a movie actor and starred in the "Lone Wolf" series after the War, from which he graduated to starring as Philip Marlowe in the CBS radio series. Then, when TV came along, he was very quickly into working in all genres, from comedy to drama to TV Westerns. He also experimented with innovation in the film industry, starring in two films made in Psychorama. His last film appearance was a cameo in "Funny Girl" and he died of a heart attack at the age of 54 in Stockholm after completing a pilot TV show, "Private Entrance". His contribution to the American entertainment industry was unique and it is surely an omission by the radio industry that he has not received a posthumous Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for the vast body of work he made throughout his career. Yes, truly, Gerald Mohr was someone special.

  • Stared in best version of "Four Feathers."

    • Michael Robertson
    • 2009-11-15

    I have seen several versions of the movie, "Four Feathers," and Gerald Mohr played the best part in the staring role of Mr. Havershim(sp?). It's been years since seeing the movie and was able to see it only once. Would love to see it again.

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