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Donald Meek

Donald Meek

  • Stagecoach (1939, April 22 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Pennies From Heaven (1936, May 02 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Toast Of New York, The (1937, May 20 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Two Girls And A Sailor (1944, May 21 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Old Man Rhythm (1935, May 29 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Feminine Touch, The (1941, June 04 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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  • "The Meek shall inherit the supporting roles"

    • Martin F. Farricker
    • 2007-08-08

    The Stars, great and powerful, came and went over the years. But, many little, meek actors outlasted the big names. Such, was the meekest of them all. Apply named, Donald Meek. Small in stature, but huge with talent, he delighted audiances in over one hundred roles. Mr. Meek was fortunate to work in the movie industry when script writers and directors prominently featured the supporting players equally, if not more than the films' stars. Unlike todays films, where the stars are on screen for the entire movie, proving to make the feature boring. The supporting actors added interest, color and great entertainment to the vehicle. In addition to the main plot of the films, were sub-plots performed by the supporting actors, which many times proved to be more interesting than the main story. Often, there were more than one sub-plot. You will recognize these in the movies of the great directors. A perfect example of this, is John Ford's, "Stagecoach". The quintesential scene in the coach, between Donald Meek, as the whiskey drummer and the great, Thomas Mitchell, as the medical lush is a masterpiece of sub-plot. Others in the same movie were performed by John Carridine, Andy Devine and G. Bankcroft. The big stars were great, but where would they have been without the small stars? And, one of the brightest was the small and meek....Donald Meek. Martin F. Farricker.

  • Talented, Versatile Actor

    • Walter Moores
    • 2007-06-18

    Donald Meek is one of my favorite stock characters. It appears that his performances over the years have been overlooked as there is little biographical information on him or commentary on the memorable roles he played. From an adorable toy maker (You Can't Take It With You) to a nazi sympathizer (Air Raid Wardens) with a stint with Mae West in between (My Little Chickadee), this remarkable actor was a master of his craft yet has received so little recognition. He deserved an Oscar for his role in YCTIWY just for being a 'lily.' One will have to see the movie to understand that. Cheers for Donald Meek, the lovable character actor.

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