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Geraldine McEwan

Geraldine McEwan

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Also Known As: Geraldine Mckeown Died: January 30, 2015
Born: May 9, 1932 Cause of Death: Stroke complications
Birth Place: Berkshire, England, GB Profession: actor, director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Like Judi Dench, Geraldine McEwan is a British actress best known for her stage roles who has also made the occasional foray into film and television. Born and raised in Windsor, she began her acting career as a teenager and gradually made her way through various repertory companies to land in the mid-1950s at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-Upon-Avon. After joining the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1961, McEwan distinguished herself in such roles as Beatrice in "Much Ado About Nothing" and Ophelia in "Hamlet." Over the course of the next three decades, the actress amassed a formidable array of credits, originating roles in such contemporary classics as Joe Orton's "Loot" (1965) and tackling many of the classics like "The School for Scandal" (her Broadway debut in 1963), "The Rivals" (in 1983) and more recently, the absurdist "The Chairs" (a return to Broadway in 1998).McEwan has made only a handful of feature appearances including starring opposite Laurence Olivier in Strindberg's "The Dance of Death" (1968). She was suitably aristocratic in the uneven comedy "Foreign Body" (1986) and provided an amusing turn as the maid teaching English to the French queen (Emma Thompson) in Kenneth...

Like Judi Dench, Geraldine McEwan is a British actress best known for her stage roles who has also made the occasional foray into film and television. Born and raised in Windsor, she began her acting career as a teenager and gradually made her way through various repertory companies to land in the mid-1950s at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in Stratford-Upon-Avon. After joining the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1961, McEwan distinguished herself in such roles as Beatrice in "Much Ado About Nothing" and Ophelia in "Hamlet." Over the course of the next three decades, the actress amassed a formidable array of credits, originating roles in such contemporary classics as Joe Orton's "Loot" (1965) and tackling many of the classics like "The School for Scandal" (her Broadway debut in 1963), "The Rivals" (in 1983) and more recently, the absurdist "The Chairs" (a return to Broadway in 1998).

McEwan has made only a handful of feature appearances including starring opposite Laurence Olivier in Strindberg's "The Dance of Death" (1968). She was suitably aristocratic in the uneven comedy "Foreign Body" (1986) and provided an amusing turn as the maid teaching English to the French queen (Emma Thompson) in Kenneth Branagh's stirring remake of "Henry V" (1989). More recently, she won plaudits as the town eccentric in "The Love Letter" (1999). Her small screen roles have allowed McEwan better showcases for her talents. She dominated the Scottish miniseries version of "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" (shown on PBS in 1979), all but erasing memories of Maggie Smith's Oscar-winning bravura performance. McEwan did battle with Prunella Scales as social rivals in the amusing London Weekly Television miniseries "Mapp & Lucia" (1985-86). Among her other notable small screen appearances was her strong turn as the deeply religious mother of a lesbian in the BBC miniseries "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit" (1990).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

2.
 Vanity Fair (2004) Lady Southdown
3.
 Magdalene Sisters, The (2002) Sister Bridget
4.
 Food of Love (2002) Novotna
5.
 Contaminated Man (2000)
6.
 Love's Labour's Lost (2000) Holofernia
7.
 Titus (1999) Nurse
8.
 Love Letter, The (1999) Miss Scattergoods
9.
 Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991) Mortianna
10.
 Henry V (1989) Alice
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Appeared as cranky spinster who hired "Mulberry" in the British sitcom
1965:
Appeared in the original production of Joe Orton's black comedy "Loot"
1968:
Co-starred with Laurence Olivier in the film version of Strindberg's "The Dance of Death"
1956:
Early British TV credit, "George and Margaret" for ITV
1961:
Film acting debut in "No Kidding/Beware of Children"
1951:
London debut in "Who Goes There!"
1999:
Made cameo appearance in "Titus"
1958:
Toured the Soviet Union with the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre
1964:
American TV acting debut in "The Thomas Hart Benton Story", an episode of the NBC series "Profiles in Courage"
1982:
Co-starred in the British miniseries "The Barchester Chronicles" (aired on "Masterpiece Theatre" in the USA in 1984)
2003:
Co-starred in the Irish-set drama "Magdalene Sisters"
1999:
Had featured role as the town busybody in "The Love Letter"
:
Played opposite Prunella Scales in the four-part series "Mapp & Lucia" (aired on PBS in 1986)
:
Returned to the National Theatre, starring in such plays as "The Rivals" and "You Can't Take It With You"
1989:
Appeared as Alice in Kenneth Branagh's version of "Henry V"
1963:
Broadway debut as Lady Teazle in "The School for Scandal"
1996:
Cast as Miriam, the sister of Ben Kingsley's "Moses
2000:
Co-starred in Kenneth Branagh's musicalization of "Love's Labour's Lost"
:
Directed stage production of "As You Like It" (for the Renaissance Theatre Company)
1976:
Had role of Lady Bellaston in "The Bawdy Adventures of Tom Jones"
1957:
Played Frankie Adams in the London production of "A Member of the Wedding"
1946:
Stage acting debut as an attendant to Hippolyta in "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in Windsor, England
1955:
Had the title role in "Patience" in Brighton
1991:
Last film role to date, Mortianna in "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves"" in the TNT miniseries
1990:
Played the heroine's starchy evangelist mother in the three-part BBC miniseries "Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit" (an edited version aired on A&E in the USA)
1978:
Played the title role in the Scottish TV miniseries "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie" (aired in the USA on PBS)
1998:
Returned to Broadway opposite Richard Briers in Eugene Ionesco's "The Chairs"
:
Was a member of the National Theatre
1961:
Was a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company; essayed such roles as Olivia in "Twelfth Night", Beatrice in "Much Ado About Nothing" and Ophelia in "Hamlet"
2005:
Voice-acted as Miss Thripp in "The Curse of the Were-Rabbit"
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Companions close complete companion listing

husband:
Hugh Crutwell. Playwright, director. Married on May 17, 1953.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Donald McKeown. Printer.
mother:
Nora McKeown.
son:
Greg Crutwell.
daughter:
Claudia Crutwell.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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