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Alec McCowen

Alec McCowen

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: May 26, 1925 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Kent, England, GB Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1942:
Stage debut as Micky in "Paddy, the Next Best Thing"
:
Appeared in various British repertory productions
1945:
Toured Indian and Burmese cities in "Love in a Mist"
1950:
First role in London, Maxim in "Ivanov"
1951:
Accompanied Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh to New York, making his Broadway debut as a messenger in "Anthony and Cleopatra"
1953:
Film debut in "The Cruel Sea"
1954:
Portrayed Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and Barnaby Tucker in English stage versions of "Moulin Rouge" and Thornton Wilder's "The Matchmaker"
1958:
Appeared as a passenger on board the Titanic in "A Night to Remember"
:
Played Mercutio in Franco Zeffirelli's production of "Romeo and Juliet" at the Old Vic; during same season, acted the title role in "Richard II", Malvolio in "Twelfth Night" and Oberon in "A Midsummer Night's Dream", all at the Old Vic
1962:
Joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, playing the Fool to Paul Scofield's Lear in "King Lear"
1962:
Delivered a nice turn as a psychiatrist in Tony Richardson's "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner", adapted to the screen by Alan Silitoe from his short story
1964:
Reprised "Lear" role opposite Scofield in RSC production at NYC's State Theatre
:
Originated the role of Father William Rolfe in Peter Luke's "Hadrian VII", eventually playing it on Broadway; earned Tony nomination
1970:
Played title role in Birmingham Repertory Theatre production of "Hamlet"
:
Portrayed Philip in Christopher Hampton's "The Philanthropist" on the London stage and later on Broadway; received second Tony nomination
1972:
Acted in the films of two giants, George Cukor's "Travels With My Aunt" and Alfred Hitchcok's "Frenzy"
1972:
Directed London stage production of "While the Sun Shines"
1973:
Partnered opposite Diana Rigg in Tony Harrison's inspired reworking of Moliere's "The Misanthrope"
1975:
Reprised Alceste for Broadway production of "The Misanthrope"
1977:
Performed the role of Martin Dysart on Broadway in "Equus", reprising the role he had played at the Old Vic in 1973
1978:
Starred in one-man-show, "St Mark's Gospel", in both London and NYC; reprised show in 1981 and 1990; adapted the script and directed all incarnations; received third Tony nomination
1983:
As Q, 007's favorite science expert, displayed the latest gadgetry to Sean Connery in "Never Say Never Again"
1987:
Delivered a thoroughly enjoyable turn as the Wing Commander, one of Julie Walters' bizarre menage, in the film "Personal Services"
1987:
Played Acting High Commissioner in Richard Attenborough's "Cry Freedom"
1989:
Interrupted tour of his one-man-show "Shakespeare, Cole and Company" to play the Bishop of Ely in Kenneth Branagh's film version of "Henry V"
1993:
Portrayed Sillerton Jackson in Martin Scorsese's "The Age of Innocence", adapted from the Edith Wharton novel
1993:
Provided narration for HBO's "Shakespeare: The Annimated Tales" version of "Macbeth"
1995:
Last feature film to date, Malcolm McKay's "Cruel Train"
1996:
Narrated HBO's "Shakespeare: The Animated Tales" version of "King Richard III"
2000:
Had supporting role in the acclaimed British miniseries "Longitude"
2000:
Made cameo appearance in the BBC adaptation of "David Copperfield"

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