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Jonathan Nossiter

Jonathan Nossiter

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: November 12, 1961 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Washington, Washington D.C., USA Profession: director, screenwriter, assistant director, sommelier, furniture mover

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Renaissance man Jonathan Nossiter's film "Sunday" wowed them at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival, winning him the Grand Jury Prize and the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, which he shared with James Lasdun. This son of NEW YORK TIMES reporter Bernard Nossiter came by his proficiency in five languages honestly, growing up in England, France, Italy and India, among other places. He studied painting at the Ecole de Beaux Arts in Paris but caught the film bug at Dartmouth where he eventually graduated. In order to learn how to direct actors, he worked in the theater as an assistant director in both NYC and London before becoming Adrian Lyne's assistant and right-hand man on "Fatal Attraction" (1987). Along the way, Nossiter also developed a love of wines that rivals his love of movies and has worked as a sommelier in some very fashionable NYC restaurants. Author and performer Quentin Crisp ended up on the cutting-room floor for "Fatal Attraction", but Nossiter made him the centerpiece of his first directorial effort, the documentary "Resident Alien: Quentin Crisp in America" (1990). Well received but hardly a moneymaker, the movie plugged into the theme of exile, something the well-traveled Nossiter knew...

Renaissance man Jonathan Nossiter's film "Sunday" wowed them at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival, winning him the Grand Jury Prize and the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award, which he shared with James Lasdun. This son of NEW YORK TIMES reporter Bernard Nossiter came by his proficiency in five languages honestly, growing up in England, France, Italy and India, among other places. He studied painting at the Ecole de Beaux Arts in Paris but caught the film bug at Dartmouth where he eventually graduated. In order to learn how to direct actors, he worked in the theater as an assistant director in both NYC and London before becoming Adrian Lyne's assistant and right-hand man on "Fatal Attraction" (1987). Along the way, Nossiter also developed a love of wines that rivals his love of movies and has worked as a sommelier in some very fashionable NYC restaurants.

Author and performer Quentin Crisp ended up on the cutting-room floor for "Fatal Attraction", but Nossiter made him the centerpiece of his first directorial effort, the documentary "Resident Alien: Quentin Crisp in America" (1990). Well received but hardly a moneymaker, the movie plugged into the theme of exile, something the well-traveled Nossiter knew plenty about and would return to in "Sunday". Along with writer James Lasdun, Nossiter fashioned a Lasdun story into his debut feature, changing the location from London to Queens, New York, which had always appealed to his international mongrel sense as a place that is everywhere and nowhere at the same time. Though the success of "Sunday" may cause Nossiter to give up his career as sommelier, nothing could undermine his abiding love of wine.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
2.
  MondoVino (2004) Director
3.
  Signs & Wonders (2000) Director
4.
  Sunday (1997) Director
5.
  Resident Alien (1990) Director

CAST: (feature film)

VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in England, France, Italy and India, among other places
1977:
Began working in restaurants in Paris at age 15 (date approximate)
:
While attending Dartmouth became interested in filmmaking
:
After graduation, worked in theater as an assistant director in NYC and London
:
Converted his "Prometheus" sreenplay into a stage play and directed it at the off-Broadway Morse Theatre
1986:
Served as Adrian Lyne's assistant during the filming of "Fatal Attraction" (released 1987)
1990:
Produced, directed and edited "Resident Alien", a documentary about Quentin Crisp
:
Met co-scenarist James Lasdun at a party; Lasdun had written a short story Nossiter wanted to film
1997:
First feature film released, "Sunday"; premiered at the Sundance Film Festival
2000:
Second feature "Signs & Wonders" screened in competition at Berlin Film Festival
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Dartmouth College: Hanover , New Hampshire -
Ecole des Beaux Arts: -
San Francisco Art Institute: San Francisco , California -

Notes

Nossiter speaks five languages.

"Maybe it's my anarchic spirit, but I advocate taking pleasure in whatever happens." --Jonathan Nossiter in New York Post, August 21, 1997.

"I literally fell off my seat. I thought it was a joke. Honestly, it took about four months before I stopped checking my mailbox here to see if they'd sent a letter saying they'd made a mistake." --Nossiter on his success at the Sundance Festival to Los Angeles Times, August 17, 1997.

"He has no mask. In other words, whatever he's feeling, it shows instantly all over his face, which is really refreshing. It's invaluable for you because you know that you're not being BS'd. One is so used to in Hollywood never knowing what the hell people really mean. And Jonathan goes into contortions over stuff because he really cares. He kind of went to war with me and agonized as I did over everything, whether it was casting or the script or whatever. We were very close on it." --Director Adrian Lyne on Nossiter as his assistant for "Fatal Attraction" in Los Angeles Times, August 17, 1997.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Bernard Nossiter. Newspaper reporter. Worked at <i>The Washington Post</i> and <i>The New York Times</i> deceased.

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