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Dorothy Malone

Dorothy Malone

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Also Known As: Dorothy Maloney,Dorothy Eloise Maloney,Dorothy Maloney Died:
Born: January 30, 1925 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: Cast ... actor model
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BIOGRAPHY

Signed out of Southern Methodist University at age 18 by RKO, brunette (later blonde) leading lady Dorothy Malone made her film debut in "The Falcon and the Co-Ed" under her real last name Maloney. When she moved to Warner Bros. in 1945, she dropped the "y" and soon made her first impact as a nymphomaniac entertaining Humphrey Bogart one thundery afternoon in "The Big Sleep" (1946). Early in her career, her roles consisted mainly of standard pretty girl leads, but it was as a fine dramatic actress that she made her mark, gaining acclaim in the 1950s for her strong, sensual portrayals of experienced, world-weary, sometimes neurotic women, notably in Douglas Sirk's "Written on the Wind" (1956), for which she won an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress, and "Tarnished Angels" (1957). Malone also turned in a top-notch performance as a woman trapped by falling debris in "The Last Voyage" (1960), playing almost the entire movie with only her nose and occasionally her mouth above sea level.

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