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Blue Velvet ... Cleancut college boy Jeffrey finds his Mayberry-like hometown is not so normal... more info $11.95was $14.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: David Keith Lynch Died:
Born: January 20, 1946 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Missoula, Montana, USA Profession: director, screenwriter, animator, songwriter, producer, actor, painter, cartoonist, furniture designer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

nces by Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern on their trek through a nightmarish American landscape. Lynch followed with another critical and commercial failure when he returned to "Twin Peaks" terrain for the feature "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me" (1992). Critics savaged it, audiences hissed at Cannes, and U.S. moviegoers stayed away, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that the "Twin Peaks" time had come and gone.After a few short-lived television projects, Lynch contributed to the experimental film project "Lumiere and Company" (1995), with his visually compelling "Premonitions Following an Evil Deed." Reteaming with writer Gifford, and returning once again to a neo-noir motif, Lynch next unleashed the unapologetically enigmatic "Lost Highway" (1997) on an unsuspecting public. Starring Bill Pullman, Patricia Arquette, Balthazar Getty and featuring a truly unsettling performance by Robert Blake, "Lost Highway" played out like a fever dream â¿¿ non-linear, often terrifying, and offering no final answer to whatever questions it may have posed. In the film, Pullman plays a jazz musician who suspects his wife (Arquette) of having an affair. For her part, Arquette plays another woman in a parallel story line,...

nces by Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern on their trek through a nightmarish American landscape. Lynch followed with another critical and commercial failure when he returned to "Twin Peaks" terrain for the feature "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me" (1992). Critics savaged it, audiences hissed at Cannes, and U.S. moviegoers stayed away, proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that the "Twin Peaks" time had come and gone.

After a few short-lived television projects, Lynch contributed to the experimental film project "Lumiere and Company" (1995), with his visually compelling "Premonitions Following an Evil Deed." Reteaming with writer Gifford, and returning once again to a neo-noir motif, Lynch next unleashed the unapologetically enigmatic "Lost Highway" (1997) on an unsuspecting public. Starring Bill Pullman, Patricia Arquette, Balthazar Getty and featuring a truly unsettling performance by Robert Blake, "Lost Highway" played out like a fever dream â¿¿ non-linear, often terrifying, and offering no final answer to whatever questions it may have posed. In the film, Pullman plays a jazz musician who suspects his wife (Arquette) of having an affair. For her part, Arquette plays another woman in a parallel story line, with primary characters suddenly switching places and/or identities by mid-film. Predictably, Lynchâ¿¿s latest offering left audiences and reviewers scratching their collective heads. Never one to play it safe, Lynch confounded expectations when he directed the G-rated "The Straight Story" (1999) for Disney Studios, a fact-based drama about an elderly man â¿¿ played to perfection with sincerity and quiet nobility by Richard Farnsworth â¿¿ who rode a tractor several hundred miles in order to reconcile with his ailing, estranged brother. With "The Straight Story" Lynch demonstrated an ability to tell a crowd pleasing, readily accessible story, while still making the film undeniably his own.

That same year, Lynch had another go at developing a television series. With the go-ahead from ABC, he began shooting the pilot episode, but after disagreements as to content and tone, the network put the project on indefinite hiatus. Even maverick cable channels like HBO passed on the show until French producer Alain Sarde was sufficiently impressed to offer to bankroll additional footage, allowing Lynch to turn the pilot into a feature film that premiered at Cannes in 2001. A dystopian look at the pursuit of fame and the dark side of Hollywood, "Mulholland Dr." (2001) was a cinematic echo of Billy Wilder's masterpiece "Sunset Boulevard" (1950). Many of the typical Lynchian touches could be found, with creepy villains, oddball secondary characters and a mid-film switch that echoed "Lost Highway," but it all played out more effectively this time. Lynch shared the Cannes Best Director Award with Joel Coen for "The Man Who Wasnâ¿¿t There" (2001), and the film opened to universal critical acclaim. Although, to a large extent, audiences found themselves perplexed, if not outright frustrated by Lynchâ¿¿s latest offering, "Mulholland Dr." did relatively well in theaters and was considered a modest success. However, Mulholland" eventually became a cult classic and, along with "Blue Velvet," recognized as one of Lynchâ¿¿s two greatest cinematic achievements. Over the next several years, Lynch turned his attention to the Internet, filming shorts and building his website, davidlynch.com, before releasing the feature film "Inland Empire" (2006). Shot entirely on digital video, "Inland Empire" nonetheless featured many of the same characteristics as Lynchâ¿¿s recent movies, primarily a non-linear story, actors morphing into completely new characters, and a mystery which the auteur director seemed to have little interest in resolving.

Following "Inland Empire," Lynch spent several years exploring various artistic outlets outside of feature films. Along with a plethora of digital shorts and other low-profile filmic experiments, Lynch returned to his interest in music with 2009's Dark Night of the Soul, an audiovisual collaboration with Danger Mouse (Brian Burton) and Sparklehorse (Mark Linkous). This was followed by Lynch's first album on which he sang and played instruments as well as writing and producing songs, 2011's Crazy Clown Time. A follow-up album, The Big Dream (2013), featured a collaboration with Swedish pop singer/songwriter Lykke Li. During this period, Lynch also had a recurring role on the animated sitcom "The Cleveland Show" (Fox 2009-2013) as the surreally cantankerous bartender Gus. On October 6, 2014, Lynch and Mark Frost jointly announced a new 9-episode series of "Twin Peaks," set to air on Showtime in 2016.

in. Ultimately, Lynch decided to helm an adaptation of Frank Herbertâ¿¿s epic science fiction novel Dune for producer Dino De Laurentiis, not due to any affinity for the project, but because the Italian movie mogul agreed to produce Lynchâ¿¿s follow up effort with zero studio interference. The experience would be a vastly different one from that of "The Elephant Man," undeniably affecting the future trajectory of Lynchâ¿¿s career.

Adapting Herbertâ¿¿s byzantine 500-page tome of intergalactic politics, religion, and war into a coherent film script was an incredible challenge for Lynch; the filming of "Dune" (1984) on location in the Mexican deserts, and enlisting tens of thousands of extras, even more so. In order to bring the final film in at the two-hour mark, substantial cuts and post-production changes were made to Lynchâ¿¿s preferred vision. The result was a nearly incomprehensible narrative, a dismal performance at the box office, mixed-to-negative notices from critics, and an incredibly painful lesson for the sophomore director. Bruised but determined, and now armed with his deal to make his next picture with complete autonomy, Lynch prepared to make "Blue Velvet" (1986). Ostensibly described as a surrealistic film noir, "Blue Velvet" defied neat categorization. Starring Kyle MacLachlan as a young man embroiled in a mystery surrounding a beautiful, emotionally troubled woman played by Isabella Rossellini, the film was clearly born out of the deepest regions of Lynchâ¿¿s psyche. Themes of violence, voyeurism, corruption and sexual deviance coexisted with a bucolic, small town setting reminiscent of a Norman Rockwell painting, defining what would later become known as the "Lynchian" aesthetic. The film also marked a rebirth, of sorts, for mercurial actor Dennis Hopper, who, as sociopath Frank Booth, gave one of the more memorable, unrestrained, and truly disturbing performances in film history. "Blue Velvet" caused a sensation among critics upon its release and garnered Lynch another Academy Award nomination for Best Director, later achieving cult classic status on video and DVD.

In the late 1980s, Lynch turned his energies to television, collaborating with novelist-screenwriter Mark Frost on the groundbreaking series "Twin Peaks" (ABC, 1989-1991). Occupying much of the same territory as "Blue Velvet," the series chronicled the investigation into the brutal murder of Laura Palmer, a high school girl from a rural Washington town. Beginning with the Lynch-directed pilot episode, "Twin Peaks" became an instant sensation, and mid-way through its first season was a certified national phenomenon, prompting media outlets across the country to ask, "Who killed Laura Palmer?" As brightly as the series burned initially, it would sputter out in its second season, due in large part to Lynchâ¿¿s chaffing under network interference and his distancing himself from the show prior to its cancelation. Though Lynchâ¿¿s return to film "Wild at Heart" (1990), adapted from a novel by future collaborator Barry Gifford, won the prestigious Palme d'Or at Cannes, it met with critical disfavor and audience ambivalence at home. Many found the crime spree road movie's unrestrained scenes of brain bashing and decapitation all but unbearable, despite strong performa

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Dynamic:01 (2007)
2.
3.
  Mulholland Dr. (2001) Director
4.
  Straight Story, The (1999) Director
5.
  Lost Highway (1997) Director
6.
  Lumiere Et Compagnie (1996) Featured Director
7.
8.
  Wild at Heart (1990) Director
9.
  Blue Velvet (1986) Director
10.
  Dune (1984) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Lucky (2017)
2.
4.
 Side by Side (2012)
5.
 Dynamic:01 (2007)
6.
 Lynch (2007)
7.
 Words In Progress (2004) Himself
9.
 Nadja (1994) Morgue Attendant
10.
 Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me (1992) Gordon Cole
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
As a child, lived in Sandpointe and Boise, ID, Spokane, WA, and Alexandria, VA
:
Worked as shop assistant, engineer, janitor, newspaper deliverer, in between studies
1966:
First film, a one-minute color animated loop entitled "Six Men Getting Sick" shown on three skull-shaped screens (based on Lynch's head) to the accompaniment of a siren (date approximate)
1967:
Made short film combining animation and live action, "The Alphabet" as entry in Pennsylvania Academy contest
1970:
Made first short live-action film "The Grandmother"; received grants that totaled $5,000 by American Film Institute (completed film for $7,200)
1971:
Began working on first feature "Eraserhead"; first feature collaboration with cinematographer Frederick Elmes and actor Jack Nance
1977:
"Eraserhead" released
1980:
Earned first Oscar nomination as Best Director for "The Elephant Man"; also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay (co-written with Eric Bergren and Christopher DeVore)
1983:
Created and illustrated syndicated comic strip "The Angriest Dog in the World"
1984:
First project with actor Kyle MacLachlan, "Dune"; feeling like "I had sort of sold myself out," Lynch later forced the removal of his name from the film's credits
1987:
Wrote and presented documentary on Dadaist cinema "Ruth roses and revolver" for British TV series "Arena"
1987:
Won acclaim (and second Best Director Oscar nomination) for the controversial "Blue Velvet"
1987:
Produced and wrote for singers Julee Cruise and Koko Taylor (songs used in his films "Blue Velvet" and "Wild at Heart")
1989:
Composed musical work "Industrial Symphony No. 1" with Angelo Badalamenti; performed at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in November; made video in 1990
1990:
"Wild at Heart" won the prestigious Palme d'Or Award at Cannes Film Festival but met with critical disfavor in the U.S.; last feature collaboration (to date) with Frederick Elmes
1990:
Directed TV commercials for the perfumes Opium and Obsession
1990:
Created and directed episodes of popular TV series "Twin Peaks" (ABC)
1991:
Directed the music video for Chris Isaak's song "Wicked Game"; song featured in the soundtrack to "Wild at Heart"
1991:
Executive produced "The Cabinet of Dr. Ramirez"
1992:
Returned to "Twin Peaks" land with feature "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me" (also co-executive producer); wrote 11 songs
1992:
Served as creator, executive producer, and director of the premiere of ABC's short-lived (six episodes) "On the Air"
1993:
Created, executive produced, and directed "Blackout" and Tricks" episodes of HBO's "Hotel Room"
1992:
Made television commercials for Gio, the perfume by Armani(1992), for a coffee drink Coca-Cola markets in Japan (1993), and for Alka-Seltzer Plus (1993); also directed a teaser-trailer used to market Michael Jackson's "Dangerous" album
1994:
Executive produced "Nadja" (and played a small part as Morgue Attendant)
1994:
Presented the documentary "Crumb," an extraordinarily intimate portrait of underground comic artist Robert Crumb directed by Terry Zwigoff
1997:
Ran off the road with "Lost Highway," a great-looking but senseless, overlong, post-modern hybrid of film noir and "The Twilight Zone"
1997:
Helmed TV commercial for the home pregnancy test Clear Blue Easy
1999:
Directed the atypically based-on-fact "The Straight Story," about a man who drove a tractor from Iowa to Wisconsin to reunite with his estranged brother
1999:
Helmed the pilot "Mulholland Drive" for ABC; series not picked up; Lynch received additional funding from StudioCanal and shot more footage to create a feature film; premiered at Cannes in 2001 where it shared the Best Director trophy; (released theatrically in fall 2001)
2002:
Created a series of online shorts "Dumb Land," which were intentionally crude both in content and execution; the eight-episode series was later released on DVD
2002:
Helmed "Rabbits," an 8-episode series of short videos shown exclusively on DavidLynch.com for paying members
2006:
Directed "Inland Empire," starring regulars such as Laura Dern, Harry Dean Stanton, and Justin Theroux; film shot entirely in digital format
2009:
Executive produced Werner Herzog's crime drama "My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done"
2010:
Lent his voice to the character Gus on the Fox animated series "Family Guy" and spin-off "The Cleveland Show"
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Education

Corcoran School of Art: Washington , Washington D.C. - 1963 - 1964
Boston Museum School: Boston , Massachusetts - 1964 - 1965
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania - 1965 - 1967
Center For Advanced Film Studies, American Film Institute: Los Angeles , California - 1970 - 1972

Notes

Lynch launched a members only web site at www.davidlynch.com in December 2001.

He served as president of the jury at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival.

When Lynch was a child, his father used to drive him into the deep woods, drop him off, then go to his job as a scientist for the Forest Service. He would leave young David completely alone, surrounded, as the filmmaker once told Time magazine, by "the most beautiful forests, where the trees are very tall and shafts of sunlight come down in the mountain stream and the rainbow trout leap out."

Lynch's interest in furniture making started at an early age, when he hung around his father's wood shop, learning how to use tools and mastering the fundamentals of building. Though he often built furniture for his movies, his first professional efforts at marketing his furniture came in the early 1990s when he sold a tiny expresso table (priced at $600) through Skankworld, a vintage furniture store in Los Angeles. He showed his attractive Club Table, an effective marraige of wood and steel which comes with special recessed areas to hold drinks, at the prestigious Salone Del Mobile in Milan and has an agreement with a Swiss Company to produce his pieces on a limited basis.

About the failure of "Wild at Heart" and "Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me": "When you love something and feel you've done it correctly, then negative criticism doesn't hurt so bad. I love those movies. But in order to say you're successful, a film has to make quite a lot of money, and I haven't really done that. If I was successful in that way, I'd be ... I don't know, making pictures maybe more within the system." --David Lynch to Rolling Stone, March 6, 1997.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Peggy Reavey. Artist. Married in 1967; divorced in 1974; mother of Jennifer; appeared in "The Alphabet".
wife:
Mary Lynch. Married in 1977; divorced in 1987; mother of Austin; sister of production designer and director Jack Fisk.
companion:
Isabella Rossellini. Actor, model. No longer together; acted in Lynch's "Blue Velvet".
companion:
Mary Sweeney. Editor, producer, screenwriter. Edited "Twin Peaks" series and film; produced and edited "Lost Highway" and "Mulholland Dr."; mother of Riley.
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Family close complete family listing

father:
Donald Lynch. Research scientist for Department of Agriculture.
mother:
Sunny Lynch. Language tutor.
brother:
John Lynch. Engineer. Younger.
sister:
Margaret Lynch. Younger; was a screenplay consultant and provided sound effects for "The Grandmother".
daughter:
Jennifer Chambers Lynch. Director, novelist. Born in April 1968; mother Peggy, Reavey.
son:
Austin Lynch. Born in 1982; mother, Mary Fisk.
son:
Riley Lynch. Mother, Mary Sweeney.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Images" Hyperion

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