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Ida Lupino

Ida Lupino

  • Hard Way, The (1942) August 24 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Bigamist, The (1953) August 27 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Hitch-Hiker, The (1953) August 27 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
  • Search For Beauty (1934) September 05 (ET) - Reminder REMINDER
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Also Known As: Died: August 3, 1995
Born: February 4, 1918 Cause of Death: complications from a stroke and colon cancer
Birth Place: London, England, GB Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1918:
Born in London during a German zeppelin bombing
:
Wrote and produced her first play, "Mademoiselle", at age seven
:
Suffered from polio as a child
:
Joined a touring theater company
1932:
First film appearance (a bit) in "The Love Race", directed by her uncle, Lupino Lane
1932:
Official film acting debut at age 14 in "Her First Affaire", promoted as "the English Jean Harlow"
1933:
Went to US under contract to Paramount; tested (unsuccessfully) for "Alice in Wonderland"
1934:
US film debut in "Search for Beauty"
1937:
Left film acting for about a year after the failure of "Fight for Your Lady"; spent time writing and composing music, including the score for one of her father's shows and a piece, "Aladdin Suite", performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic
1939:
Achieved star status with "The Light That Failed"
1940:
Signed contract with Warner Bros.
1941:
Reported in "Picturegoer" magazine that "she gave up a contract at $1700 a week rather than play in unsuitable stories"
1946:
First film as producer (uncredited co-producer), "Young Widow"
1947:
Left Warner Bros.
1947:
Formed Arcadia Productions with Benedict Bogeaus; no films produced
1948:
First film credited as producer (also first film for own company, Emerald Productions, Inc. which she co-founded with Collier Young and Anson Bond and named after her mother), "The Judge"
1948:
Performed her own songs, including "One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)", for her role as a nightclub singer in the film noir, "Road House"
1949:
Took over directing "Not Wanted" for an ailing Elmer Clifton; uncredited
1949:
Credited feature film directing and co-writing debut, "Never Fear"
1950:
Changed name of production company to The Filmakers; took on writer Marvin Wald as another partner
1951:
Joined with David Niven, Dick Powell and Charles Boyer to form Four Star Productions
1951:
Reportedly helmed portions of the feature "On Dangerous Ground" while director Nicholas Ray was ill
:
Appeared on a rotating basis (with David Niven, Charles Boyer and Dick Powell) on "Four Star Playhouse", a CBS-TV dramatic anthology series
:
Formed Bridget Productions (named after her daughter by Howard Duff)
1956:
Acted in last feature films for 13 years, "While the City Sleeps" and "Strange Intruder"
:
Directed episodes of TV series such as "Have Gun--Will Travel" (the episode "Lady With a Gun" 1959), "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" (ep. "Sybilla" 1960), "The Untouchables" (ep. "Man in the Cooler" 1963) and "The Fugitive" (ep. "The Glass Tightrope" 1963)
:
Produced, co-starred (opposite then-husband Howard Duff) and directed episodes of the CBS sitcom, "Mr. Adams and Eve"
1966:
Directed last feature film, "The Trouble with Angels"
1969:
Returned to acting in feature films in "Backtrack"
1982:
Appeared in cameo role in only film of the 1980s, "Deadhead Miles"
:
Health declined; moved to Motion Picture Home
1987:
Featured in footage used in "American Lifestyles", a six-part compilation film using material from the "March of Time" newsreels from 1939 to 1950

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