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Walter Lundin

Walter Lundin

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A cinematographer from film's early days, Walter Lundin has had a career closely associated with that of comedy legend Harold Lloyd. Born in 19th-century Chicago, Lundin began his career working on silent film shorts in 1915. His first such effort was "Willie Runs the Park," the first of many collaborations between Lloyd and director Hal Roach. Other films he shot with Lloyd include "Over the Fence" and 1917's "Pinched," which Lloyd directed. He worked with both Roach and Lloyd on numerous shorts leading up to the 1923 feature-length comedy thriller "Safety Last!," one of the silent era's most famous films and an enduring classic of cinematic history. Lloyd split with Hal Roach after that success, but Lundin continued working with the actor and followed him through his transition into sound films. After "Girl Shy" in 1924, the college-themed "The Freshman" in 1925, and several more silent films, the pair made Lloyd's first talkie, "Welcome Danger," in 1929. The 1934 comedy "The Cat's-Paw" would prove to be his last film with Lloyd. He also shot many of duo Laurel and Hardy's comedies in the '30s including "The Laurel-Hardy Murder Case," the circus-themed "The Chimp," and the musical feature "The...

A cinematographer from film's early days, Walter Lundin has had a career closely associated with that of comedy legend Harold Lloyd. Born in 19th-century Chicago, Lundin began his career working on silent film shorts in 1915. His first such effort was "Willie Runs the Park," the first of many collaborations between Lloyd and director Hal Roach. Other films he shot with Lloyd include "Over the Fence" and 1917's "Pinched," which Lloyd directed. He worked with both Roach and Lloyd on numerous shorts leading up to the 1923 feature-length comedy thriller "Safety Last!," one of the silent era's most famous films and an enduring classic of cinematic history. Lloyd split with Hal Roach after that success, but Lundin continued working with the actor and followed him through his transition into sound films. After "Girl Shy" in 1924, the college-themed "The Freshman" in 1925, and several more silent films, the pair made Lloyd's first talkie, "Welcome Danger," in 1929. The 1934 comedy "The Cat's-Paw" would prove to be his last film with Lloyd. He also shot many of duo Laurel and Hardy's comedies in the '30s including "The Laurel-Hardy Murder Case," the circus-themed "The Chimp," and the musical feature "The Bohemian Girl" in 1936. His last feature with Laurel and Hardy was the 1937 comedic Western "Way Out West," considered one of their best films. For the rest of his career, which lasted until the early '50s, he shot comedic and documentary shorts.

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CAST: (feature film)

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