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Arthur Lubin

Arthur Lubin

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Also Known As: Died: May 12, 1995
Born: July 25, 1898 Cause of Death: stroke
Birth Place: Los Angeles, California, USA Profession: director, actor

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built his reputation as a director. By the '40s, he was directing a number of Abbott and Costello comedy movies including, "Buck Privates," "In the Navy," and "Hold That Ghost." In 1943, he directed his biggest box office success, the horror classic, "Phantom of the Opera." In the '50s, Lubin directed a number of films featuring "Francis the Talking Mule." He brought the concept to television in 1958 with the show about a talking horse named "Mister Ed." After the series' successful eight-year run, Lubin continued working in television until he retired in 1981. He lived out the rest of his days with his life partner, Frank Burford. Lubin died age 96.

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built his reputation as a director. By the '40s, he was directing a number of Abbott and Costello comedy movies including, "Buck Privates," "In the Navy," and "Hold That Ghost." In 1943, he directed his biggest box office success, the horror classic, "Phantom of the Opera." In the '50s, Lubin directed a number of films featuring "Francis the Talking Mule." He brought the concept to television in 1958 with the show about a talking horse named "Mister Ed." After the series' successful eight-year run, Lubin continued working in television until he retired in 1981. He lived out the rest of his days with his life partner, Frank Burford. Lubin died age 96.

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Rain for a Dusty Summer (1972) Director
2.
  Hold On! (1966) Director
3.
4.
  The Thief of Baghdad (1961) Director
5.
  Escapade in Japan (1957) Director
6.
7.
  Star of India (1956) Director
8.
  Francis in the Navy (1955) Director
9.
  Footsteps in the Fog (1955) Director
10.
  Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Times Square (1929) Russ Glover/Benjamin Lederwitski
2.
 Eyes of the Underworld (1929) Gang leader
3.
 The Bushranger (1928) Arthur
4.
 Afraid To Love (1927) Rafael
5.
 Bardelys the Magnificent (1926) King Louis XIII
6.
 Millionaires (1926) Lew
7.
 His People (1925) Morris Cominsky [grown]
8.
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Education

Carnegie Institute of Technology: Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania - 1922

Notes

"I never considered myself a great director. I consider myself a good director, a director that produces because I am not temperamental. I do not have fits of anger and tear my hair. I get along well with actors and the production department." --Arthur Lubin in an oral history at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library, quoted in "Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood 1910-1969" by William J. Mann.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Helen Lubin.
companion:
Frank Burford.

Family close complete family listing

father:
William Lubovsky. Peddler. Polish; emigrated to USA in 1889 and changed surname to Lubin.

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