skip navigation
Joshua Logan

Joshua Logan

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (2)

Recent DVDs

 
 

Picnic DVD "One of the sexiest pictures I've ever seen." - Jack Moffitt, Hollywood... more info $14.99was $14.99 Buy Now

Ensign Pulver DVD Sign on for a lighthearted , seeworthy oceangoing comedic voyage that begins... more info $12.99was $19.99 Buy Now

Also Known As: Joshua Lockwood Logan Iii, Josh Logan Died: July 12, 1988
Born: October 5, 1908 Cause of Death: supranuclear palsy
Birth Place: Texarkana, Texas, USA Profession: director, actor, playwright, producer, stage manager, singer, dialogue director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Primarily a man of the theater, Joshua Logan fashioned a brilliant career as a writer, producer and director and was that uncommon phenomenon, the theatrical director whose success extended into films. He was also notable for his candor in discussing manic depression, a condition for which he required hospitalization on two occasions before discovering he could control it with the drug lithium carbonate. When discussing his illness, he made it quite clear that its manic phase contributed to his creativity: "Without my illness . . . I would have missed the sharpest, rarest and, yes, the sweetest moments of my existence."

Primarily a man of the theater, Joshua Logan fashioned a brilliant career as a writer, producer and director and was that uncommon phenomenon, the theatrical director whose success extended into films. He was also notable for his candor in discussing manic depression, a condition for which he required hospitalization on two occasions before discovering he could control it with the drug lithium carbonate. When discussing his illness, he made it quite clear that its manic phase contributed to his creativity: "Without my illness . . . I would have missed the sharpest, rarest and, yes, the sweetest moments of my existence."

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Paint Your Wagon (1969) Director
2.
  Camelot (1967) Director
3.
  Ensign Pulver (1964) Director
4.
  Fanny (1961) Director
5.
  Tall Story (1960) Director
6.
  South Pacific (1958) Director
7.
  Sayonara (1957) Director
8.
  Bus Stop (1956) Director
9.
  Picnic (1955) Director
10.
  I Met My Love Again (1938) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Marilyn Monroe: Beyond the Legend (1986) Interviewee
2.
 Main Street to Broadway (1953) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1916:
Saw first professional play, "Everywoman", in Shreveport, LA; a case of "love at first sight" (date approximate)
1926:
Saw first Broadway play, "What Price Glory?"
1927:
Entered Princeton University; became president of Triangle Theatre Club in senior year
:
While at Princeton, co-wrote and acted in annual reviews "Zuyder Zee" (1928), "The Golden Dog" (1929) and "The Tiger Smiles" (1930); also played football and boxed
1928:
With Bretaigne Windust, co-founded the University Players, an intercollegiate summer stock company (in Cape Cod) whose members included Henry Fonda, Margaret Sullavan and James Stewart
1931:
Won scholarship to study with Stanislavski at Moscow Arts Theatre
1931:
Returned from Russia and joined University Players for repertory season in Baltimore; directed "Mary Rose" and "Lysistrata"
1932:
Broadway debut as actor in role of Mart Strong in University Player's "Carry Nation" at Biltmore Theatre; a financial disaster, it led to company's disbandment
1933:
Acted in Broadway production "I Was Waiting for You", directed by Windust
1933:
Was sixth assistant stage manager on Broadway's "She Loves Me Not"; rapidly rose to first assistant stage manager on various productions
1935:
Broadway debut as director, "To See Ourselves"
1936:
Went to Hollywood as dialogue director under contract to David O Selznick
1936:
Returned to New York and acted in revival of "What Price Glory?"
1936:
Returned to Hollywood as dialogue director at the urging of Charles Boyer; signed to a contract by Walter Wanger
1937:
Wanger contract not renewed
1937:
Co-directed with Arthur Ripley the film "I Met My Love Again"
1938:
Directed "On Borrowed Time" which ran for more than a year at Broadway's Longacre Theatre
1938:
Followed initial Broadway success with direction of the Rodgers and Hart hit "I Married an Angel"
1939:
Married actress Barbara O'Neil; divorced in 1940
1940:
Suffered first nervous breakdown, hospitalized for nearly a year
1942:
Drafted into Army and served as public relations and intelligence officer; provided "additional direction" for Irving Berlin's review "This is the Army"
1945:
Married actress Nedda Harrigan
1946:
Directed Irving Berlin's "Annie Get Your Gun" on Broadway
1948:
Wrote (with Thomas Heggen) and directed "Mister Roberts"; production staged in London in 1950
1949:
Was co-author, co-producer and director of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "South Pacific"; won Pulitzer Prize
1952:
Salvaged the musical "Wish You Were Here" which he had co-authored, co-produced and directed by writing 54 pages of new material after its undistinguished opening; by the ninth performance, it was a new show that would sell out and remain so for two years
1953:
Second breakdown required hospitalization
1953:
Directed Broadway production of William Inge's "Picnic"
1954:
Co-authored, co-produced and directed "Fanny"
1955:
Directed film version of "Picnic"
1956:
Helmed featured adaptation of Inge's "Bus Stop"
1957:
Directed "Sayonara"; film earned Oscars for co-stars Red Buttons and Miyoshi Umeki
1958:
Helmed the feature version of the musical "South Pacific"
1960:
Directed Jane Fonda in "Tall Story"
1961:
Produced and directed film version of stage musical "Fanny"
1964:
Directed and produced "Ensign Pulver", a sequel to "Mister Roberts"; also co-wrote screenplay with Peter S Feibleman
1967:
Guided Richard Harris, Vanessa Redgrave and Franco Nero in the screen version of the musical "Camelot"
1969:
Final feature, "Paint Your Wagon"
1976:
Published autobiography "Josh: My Up and Down, In and Out Life"
1978:
Published "Movie Stars, Real People and Me", a collection of anecdotes about his life in the theater
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Princeton University: Princeton , New Jersey -
Culver Military Academy: -
Moscow Art Theater: - 1931

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Barbara O'Neil. Actor. Married June 18, 1940; divorced.
wife:
Nedda Harrigan. Actor. Born 1900; died 1989; daughter of vaudevillian Ned Harrigan.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Joshua Lockwood Logan Jr. Lumberman. Died c. 1911.
mother:
Susan McHenry Nabors. Married Col. Howard Noble after Logan's father's death of Logan's father.
step-father:
Howard Noble. Military officer. Achieved rank of colonel; was on staff of Culver Military Academy.
sister:
Mary Lee Logan. Younger.
half-brother:
Marshall Hays Noble.
son:
Thomas Heggen Logan. Musician, composer. Survived him.
daughter:
Susan Harrigan Logan. Mother, Nedda Harrigan Logan; survived him.
step-daughter:
Ann Connolly. Survived him.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Bibliography close complete biography

"Josh, My Up and Down, In and Out Life" Delacorte
"Movie Stars, Real People and Me" Delacorte

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute