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Jay Livingston

Jay Livingston

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Also Known As: Died: October 17, 2001
Born: March 28, 1915 Cause of Death: pneumonia
Birth Place: McDonald, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: Music ...
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MILESTONES

:
Born and raised near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
:
While in high school, worked as a musician at local nightspots and at parties
:
Met future collaborator Ray Evans while an undergraduate at University of Pennsylvania
1937:
Began professional collaboration with Ray Evans
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Moved to NYC
:
Worked as a piano accompanist and musical arranger at NBC
:
Was rehearsal pianist for Olsen and Johnson's "Hellzapoppin'" (1938) and "Sons o' Fun" (1941)
1941:
Professional debut as congwriter with "G'bye Now", which was incorporated into "Hellzapoppin'"
1942:
Served in the US Army
1944:
Moved to California at the urging of Olsen and Johnson; had first hit song with "Stuff Like That There"
:
Signed to a contract by Paramount
1945:
Earned first Academy Award nomination for the song " The Cat and the Canary" used in the film "Why Girls Leave Home"
1946:
Wrote the theme song to "To Each His Own"
1948:
Won first Oscar for Best Original Song "Biuttons and Bows" from the film "The Paleface"
1950:
Received second Academy Award for Best Song for "Mona Lisa" from "Captain Carey, U.S.A."
1951:
Wrote the holiday perennial "Silver Bells" (introduced in the film "The Lemon Drop Kid" by Bob Hope)
1955:
Left Paramount and worked with Evans as a freelance somgwriting team
1956:
Received third Oscar for "Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)", sung by Doris Day in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Man Who Knew Too Much"; Day later used the song as the theme for her 1960s TV sitcom
1957:
Had hit with "Tammy", sung by Debbie Reynolds in the film of the same name; song nominated for an Academy Award
1958:
Earned Oscar nomination for "Almost in Your Arms", the theme to "Houseboat"
1958:
With Evans, wrote first Broadway musical, "Oh, Captain!"; received Tony nomination
:
Wrote themes to several popular TV series, including "Bonanza" and "Mr. Ed"
1961:
Worked on second Braodway show, the unsuccessful "Let It Ride!"
1964:
Co-wrote the lyrics to Henry Mancini's composition "Dear Heart"
1975:
Last original song for a feature film to date, "the title theme of "Foxtrot"
1979:
Songs written with Ray Evans were incorporated in the Broadway musical "Sugar Babies"
1995:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

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