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Jay Livingston

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Also Known As: Jay Harold Livingston, Jay Levison Died: October 17, 2001
Born: March 28, 1915 Cause of Death: pneumonia
Birth Place: McDonald, Pennsylvania, USA Profession: composer, pianist, songwriter, vocal coach

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

With his longtime collaborator Ray Evans, Jay Livingston has been responsible for some of the more memorable movie songs from the late 1940 through the early 60s. The duo first met while both were students at the University of Pennsylvania. During holiday breaks, they played together in a band on cruise ships. After graduating, Evans and Livingston settled in NYC where they held odd jobs while trying to place their songs. In 1941, their song "G'bye Now" was incorporated in the Olsen and Johnson revue "Hellzapoppin'" and landed on "Your Hit Parade". Olsen and Johnson brought the songwriters to Hollywood in 1944 where Betty Hutton recorded "Stuff Like That There". Eventually, Evans and Livingston placed songs in films, earning their first Oscar nomination for "The Cat and the Canary" used in 1945's "Why Girls Leave Home".

With his longtime collaborator Ray Evans, Jay Livingston has been responsible for some of the more memorable movie songs from the late 1940 through the early 60s. The duo first met while both were students at the University of Pennsylvania. During holiday breaks, they played together in a band on cruise ships. After graduating, Evans and Livingston settled in NYC where they held odd jobs while trying to place their songs. In 1941, their song "G'bye Now" was incorporated in the Olsen and Johnson revue "Hellzapoppin'" and landed on "Your Hit Parade". Olsen and Johnson brought the songwriters to Hollywood in 1944 where Betty Hutton recorded "Stuff Like That There". Eventually, Evans and Livingston placed songs in films, earning their first Oscar nomination for "The Cat and the Canary" used in 1945's "Why Girls Leave Home".

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Sunset Blvd. (1950) Himself
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Born and raised near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
:
While in high school, worked as a musician at local nightspots and at parties
:
Met future collaborator Ray Evans while an undergraduate at University of Pennsylvania
1937:
Began professional collaboration with Ray Evans
:
Moved to NYC
:
Worked as a piano accompanist and musical arranger at NBC
:
Was rehearsal pianist for Olsen and Johnson's "Hellzapoppin'" (1938) and "Sons o' Fun" (1941)
1941:
Professional debut as congwriter with "G'bye Now", which was incorporated into "Hellzapoppin'"
1942:
Served in the US Army
1944:
Moved to California at the urging of Olsen and Johnson; had first hit song with "Stuff Like That There"
:
Signed to a contract by Paramount
1945:
Earned first Academy Award nomination for the song " The Cat and the Canary" used in the film "Why Girls Leave Home"
1946:
Wrote the theme song to "To Each His Own"
1948:
Won first Oscar for Best Original Song "Biuttons and Bows" from the film "The Paleface"
1950:
Received second Academy Award for Best Song for "Mona Lisa" from "Captain Carey, U.S.A."
1951:
Wrote the holiday perennial "Silver Bells" (introduced in the film "The Lemon Drop Kid" by Bob Hope)
1955:
Left Paramount and worked with Evans as a freelance somgwriting team
1956:
Received third Oscar for "Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)", sung by Doris Day in Alfred Hitchcock's "The Man Who Knew Too Much"; Day later used the song as the theme for her 1960s TV sitcom
1957:
Had hit with "Tammy", sung by Debbie Reynolds in the film of the same name; song nominated for an Academy Award
1958:
Earned Oscar nomination for "Almost in Your Arms", the theme to "Houseboat"
1958:
With Evans, wrote first Broadway musical, "Oh, Captain!"; received Tony nomination
:
Wrote themes to several popular TV series, including "Bonanza" and "Mr. Ed"
1961:
Worked on second Braodway show, the unsuccessful "Let It Ride!"
1964:
Co-wrote the lyrics to Henry Mancini's composition "Dear Heart"
1975:
Last original song for a feature film to date, "the title theme of "Foxtrot"
1979:
Songs written with Ray Evans were incorporated in the Broadway musical "Sugar Babies"
1995:
Received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Pennsylvania: Philadelphia , Pennsylvania -
McDonald High School: McDonald , Pennsylvania - 1933

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Lynne Livingston. Married c. 1946; died on January 12, 1991 at the age of 69 from complications from emphysema.
wife:
Shirley Mitchell. Actor. Married on May 16, 1992; survived him.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Maurice Livingston. Shoe store owner.
mother:
Rose Livingston.
brother:
Alan Livingston. Music executive. Served as president of Capitol Records.
sister-in-law:
Nancy Olson. Actor. Appeared in "Sunset Boulevard"; married to Alan Livingston.
daughter:
Travlyn Talmadge. Survived him.
nephew:
Christopher Livingston. Director, screenwriter.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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