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Donovan Leitch

Donovan Leitch

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Also Known As: Donovan Phillips Leitch Died:
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Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

For a brief period, Scottish folk singer Donovan was a key figure in the psychedelic rock movement of the late 1960s thanks to a string of singles, including "Sunshine Superman," "Mellow Yellow," "Hurdy Gurdy Man" and "Atlantis" which hovered along an axis of beat poetry, jazz grooves and lysergic lyrical content. He had emerged only a few years prior as an earnest folk singer, inspired by English and American traditional music, but found it difficult to avoid unflattering comparisons to Bob Dylan. He resurfaced in 1966 with the funky, flighty "Sunshine Superman," which soon established him as a kindred spirit to the counterculture movement. The end of the hippie era in the early 1970s also brought Donovan's time on the charts to a close, and by the 1980s, he and his music were largely museum pieces. The early '90s saw renewed interest in his material thanks to the British alternative scene, which echoed his melting pot approach of psychedelia, dance grooves and rock volume. Donovan settled comfortably into his status as a grandfatherly emissary from the flower power past, issuing his fragrant messages of love and freedom to audiences of new and old fans alike. His induction into the Rock and Roll...

For a brief period, Scottish folk singer Donovan was a key figure in the psychedelic rock movement of the late 1960s thanks to a string of singles, including "Sunshine Superman," "Mellow Yellow," "Hurdy Gurdy Man" and "Atlantis" which hovered along an axis of beat poetry, jazz grooves and lysergic lyrical content. He had emerged only a few years prior as an earnest folk singer, inspired by English and American traditional music, but found it difficult to avoid unflattering comparisons to Bob Dylan. He resurfaced in 1966 with the funky, flighty "Sunshine Superman," which soon established him as a kindred spirit to the counterculture movement. The end of the hippie era in the early 1970s also brought Donovan's time on the charts to a close, and by the 1980s, he and his music were largely museum pieces. The early '90s saw renewed interest in his material thanks to the British alternative scene, which echoed his melting pot approach of psychedelia, dance grooves and rock volume. Donovan settled comfortably into his status as a grandfatherly emissary from the flower power past, issuing his fragrant messages of love and freedom to audiences of new and old fans alike. His induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame firmly cemented his position as one of the 1960s' most creative figures.

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