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Philip Leacock

Philip Leacock

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Also Known As: Died: July 14, 1990
Born: October 8, 1917 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: London, England, GB Profession: director, producer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Philip Leacock is a British-born film and TV director who came to international recognition in the 1950s with realistic documentary-style dramas. The London-born Leacock spent much of his childhood at a liberal English boarding school in the Canary Islands. After a brief stint as a cinematographer for documentary films, Leacock began working as a director on fictional films with a strong realist bent, akin to the films Vittorio de Sica was making in post-war Italy. Films such as his 1952 feature "The Brave Don't Cry," based on a real-life 1950 Scottish mining disaster, had a strong documentary feel despite being scripted. Leacock continued to garner international acclaim with "The Little Kidnappers," a heart-wrenching tale of two young orphans who attempt to "adopt" an infant child. Lured by the promise of Hollywood, Leacock's attempts to break into the American marketâ¿¿the Steve McQueen action vehicle "The War Lover" and the comedy "Tamahine"â¿¿were unfortunately met with a muted response. Beginning in the 1970s, Leacock became better known for directing American TV programs, racking up dozens of credits on popular programs such as "Gunsmoke" and "The Waltons."

Philip Leacock is a British-born film and TV director who came to international recognition in the 1950s with realistic documentary-style dramas. The London-born Leacock spent much of his childhood at a liberal English boarding school in the Canary Islands. After a brief stint as a cinematographer for documentary films, Leacock began working as a director on fictional films with a strong realist bent, akin to the films Vittorio de Sica was making in post-war Italy. Films such as his 1952 feature "The Brave Don't Cry," based on a real-life 1950 Scottish mining disaster, had a strong documentary feel despite being scripted. Leacock continued to garner international acclaim with "The Little Kidnappers," a heart-wrenching tale of two young orphans who attempt to "adopt" an infant child. Lured by the promise of Hollywood, Leacock's attempts to break into the American marketâ¿¿the Steve McQueen action vehicle "The War Lover" and the comedy "Tamahine"â¿¿were unfortunately met with a muted response. Beginning in the 1970s, Leacock became better known for directing American TV programs, racking up dozens of credits on popular programs such as "Gunsmoke" and "The Waltons."

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

3.
  Angel City (1980) Director
4.
  Wild and Wooly (1978) Director
5.
  Killer on Board (1977) Director
6.
  Dying Room Only (1973) Director
7.
  Baffled (1973) Director
8.
9.
  Key West (1973) Director
10.
  When Michael Calls (1972) Director

CAST: (feature film)

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Family close complete family listing

brother:
Richard Leacock. Filmmaker.

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