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Stan Laurel

Stan Laurel

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The Laurel And... "This is another fine mess you've gotten me into!" In fact, "The Laurel and... more info $34.98was $34.98 Buy Now

Laurel And... The inimitable Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy report for duty in a winning pair of... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Laurel And... As funny as ever, this collection of early shorts features Stan Laurel and... more info $14.95was $14.95 Buy Now

TCM Archives:... In this 2-disc collection, classic comedy team Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy get... more info $39.98was $39.98 Buy Now

The Laurel And... The 3-disc "The Laurel And Hardy Collection, Vol. 1" features a trio of zany... more info $34.98was $34.98 Buy Now

Classic Comedy... Slapstick lovers will be delighted with this 3-disc "Classic Comedy Teams... more info $28.98was $28.98 Buy Now

Also Known As: Died: February 23, 1965
Born: June 16, 1890 Cause of Death: heart attack
Birth Place: Lanchashire, England, GB Profession: Cast ...
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MILESTONES

1905:
Family moved to Glasgow, Scotland, where father managed a theater
1906:
Made stage debut at Pickard's Panoptican in Glasgow, a quaint and unique house of entertainment that included a museum, a side show, a nickelodeon and a small theatre featuring second and third-rate music-hall style entertainment
1907:
Toured as a "golliwog" (a stuffed doll) in "Sleeping Beauty" pantomime
1908:
On tour in "Alone in the World"
1910:
Joined Fred Karno's company, playing various roles in show "Mumming Birds"; sometimes understudied fellow Karno performer Charlie Chaplin
1911:
Left Karno while on successful US tour in dispute over money, returning to England
1911:
Acted in "Ben Machree" at Prince's Theatre, managed by his brother Gordon
1912:
Joined Karno's second US tour as understudy to Chaplin (playing the lead role of The Drunk) in the show now titled "A Night in an English Music Hall"
:
Following Chaplin's departure from Karno for Hollywood, the troupe returned to England while Laurel remained behind touring North American vaudeville circuit in "The Nutty Burglars", a sketch of his own devising
1915:
Impersonated Chaplin in "The Keystone Trio" act
1917:
Began his professional association with actress Mae Dahlberg, appearing in a series of skits as Stan and Mae Jefferson (later Laurel)
1917:
Film debut in "Nuts in May" (with Dahlberg)
1919:
Returned to vaudeville in sketches with Dahlberg
1921:
Appeared in first film with Oliver Hardy (by coincidence, not design), the short "The Lucky Dog"
:
Made more than 60 one- and two-reelers as a solo performer
1922:
Burlesqued Rudolph Valentino in particularly well-received short "Mud and Sand"
1924:
Dismissed by Hal Roach (for second time) because of irregular status with common-law wife Dahlberg; signed with producer Joe Rock, who reportedly paid Mae to return to her native Australia
1925:
Returned to Roach studio where he reunited with Hardy for "Yes, Yes, Nanette" (co-directed by Laurel and Clarence Hennecke) and "Enough to Do" (directed by Laurel); Laurel did not act in either film
1926:
Replaced Hardy in "Get 'Em Young" after 'Babe' burned his arm in a cooking accident
1927:
'The Boys' appeared together in their eighth film, "Do Detectives Think?" (Hal Roach/Pathe), donning for the first time their trademark uniforms: a frumpy suit for Ollie, with a flapping tie to fiddle with and a postage stamp of a mustache; a natty little suit for Stanley, with a bow tie and an unruly crop of bristled hair-with a bowler hat as the crowning touch for each; Laurel and Fred Roach, however, cited "Putting Pants on Phillip" as the first official L & H film
1929:
First sound film made by Laurel and Hardy, "Unaccustomed As We are"
1931:
Made first Laurel and Hardy feature, "Pardon Us", directed by frequent helmsman James Parrott
1932:
The Laurel and Hardy comedy short "The Music Box" won the first Oscar ever given in the category of Best Short Subjects (Live Action Comedy)
1933:
Despite Laurel's increasing difficulties on set as a result of alcoholism, "Sons of the Desert" (based on their silent two-reeler "We Faw Down" 1928, one of the few shorts on which Leo McCarey received directorial credit) became one of L & H's most-loved films
1934:
Locked horns with Roach on "Babes in Toyland"; Laurel had rejected the script that Roach had written, and subsequently relationship was 'strictly business' (though they reportedly mended fences later in life); Roach's throwing up of his hands and allowing Laurel to have his way resulted in one of L & H's best films, as well as the best movie based on the Victor Herbert operetta
1934:
Officially changed surname to 'Laurel'
1935:
Last L & H shorts for Roach, "Tit for Tat", "The Fixer Uppers" and "Thicker Than Water"
1936:
First producing credit, "Our Relations"
1938:
Initial teaming with Harry Langdon providing the story, "Block-Heads"; also "The Flying Deuces" (1939)
1940:
Last quality L & H film, "Saps at Sea", directed by Gordon Douglas; story by Langdon
1940:
Formed Laurel and Hardy Feature Productions
:
After final falling out with Hal Roach, 'The Boys' fell head-first into the machinery, working initially at Fox and later at MGM; treated scandalously, they delivered listless turns in anonymous, dreary pictures; unlike at Roach, had no creative input into the comedies
1942:
Filmed one last L & H short, "The Tree in a Test Tube"
1945:
Diagnosed as diabetic
:
With Hardy enjoyed great success on the live stage, particularly in Great Britain; returning to his English music hall roots, Laurel wrote sketches for the duo which delighted sellout crowds
1950:
Final Laurel and Hardy film, "Atoll K/Utopia", doomed by poor script and production; uncredited directing by former Roach helmsman Arthur Goulding
1955:
Suffered a paralyzing stroke early in the year
1957:
Oliver Hardy died on August 7; Laurel resolved never to work on film again
1960:
Presented special Academy Award for "his creative pioneering in the field of cinema comedy"; dubbed the little bald man of gold 'Mr. Clean' and proudly displayed it in his home
1981:
Laurel and Hardy Museum opened in Ulverston, Lancashire, England, the town of Laurel's birth

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