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Richard Barthelmess

Richard Barthelmess

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  • Exceptional Group of Early Talkie Films

    • Elaine K
    • 2010-10-31

    Barthelmess achieved success before 1920 in the films he made for D.W. Griffith. He was a major star throughout the 1920's. Although he was only in his late thirties, his stardom had waned by 1935, when Warner Bros. failed to renew his contract. Prior to WW II, after appearing in a few more films, he retired. However, even as his stardom was waning between 1930 and 1935, he was making an outstanding series of films. These films include "Son of the Gods" (racial prejudice directed at the Chinese), "The Dawn Patrol" (life and death among the flyboys of WWI), "The Last Flight" (the Lost Generation, physically and psychologically wounded fliers after the Great War), "Heroes For Sale" (the effects of the Depression on veterans), and "Massacre" (mistreatment of Native Americans). His straightforward, plain, low key, rather dour acting complemented his movies. These downbeat films were not money-makers; it is not surprising that his career declined.

  • Unknown actor, now a days

    • Marilyn
    • 2010-06-06

    that really was a great actor. Unsure why he didn't find the great success in the 'talkie' period that he had in his silent film era. He was equally good in either genre. I hope that TCM would have a day to celebrate this actor's films, to help shed some light on this talented man. If you don't know who he was, please, watch 'Broken Blossoms' and 'Tol'lable David' just for starters. Then try catching 'The Enchanted Cottage (1924)' and even 'Heroes For Sale'. I mention these 4, because they aren't too difficult to find. If able to find any others, though, definitely take the time to view. He was good.

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