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Also Known As: Eugene Klass Died: December 9, 2009
Born: June 14, 1919 Cause of Death: congestive heart failure
Birth Place: New York City, New York, USA Profession: actor, producer, singer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Assured, dapper leading man and singer who, after playing in a mixed bag of Hollywood films of the 1950s, found a niche as debonair man-about-town in several TV series, and later had success onstage. A native New Yorker, Barry made it to Broadway in the 40s in plays including "Rosalinda" and Mae West's "Catherine Was Great". He signed with Paramount in the early 50s to play in "The Atomic City" (1952), as a scientist whose son is kidnapped by powers hoping to acquire a nuclear bomb recipe. Barry stayed with Paramount for two years, playing the stalwart lead in one of his best-remembered films, "The War of the Worlds" (1953). He did especially well strutting his stuff in the offbeat, underrated Western musical, "Red Garters" (1954). Despite good work in the crime drama, "Naked Alibi" (1954), Barry played second fiddle to Clark Gable and Susan Hayward in "Soldier of Fortune" (1955). Two of his best subsequent films were for director Sam Fuller: the quirky Western "Forty Guns" and an early Hollywood look at strife in Vietnam, "China Gate" (1957). Nonetheless, most of Barry's credits from 1954 to 1958 were routine action films, and TV soon became his home base of operations. Although he had played Eve...

Assured, dapper leading man and singer who, after playing in a mixed bag of Hollywood films of the 1950s, found a niche as debonair man-about-town in several TV series, and later had success onstage. A native New Yorker, Barry made it to Broadway in the 40s in plays including "Rosalinda" and Mae West's "Catherine Was Great". He signed with Paramount in the early 50s to play in "The Atomic City" (1952), as a scientist whose son is kidnapped by powers hoping to acquire a nuclear bomb recipe. Barry stayed with Paramount for two years, playing the stalwart lead in one of his best-remembered films, "The War of the Worlds" (1953). He did especially well strutting his stuff in the offbeat, underrated Western musical, "Red Garters" (1954).

Despite good work in the crime drama, "Naked Alibi" (1954), Barry played second fiddle to Clark Gable and Susan Hayward in "Soldier of Fortune" (1955). Two of his best subsequent films were for director Sam Fuller: the quirky Western "Forty Guns" and an early Hollywood look at strife in Vietnam, "China Gate" (1957). Nonetheless, most of Barry's credits from 1954 to 1958 were routine action films, and TV soon became his home base of operations. Although he had played Eve Arden's beau on the last season of the CBS sitcom "Our Miss Brooks" (1955-56), "Bat Masterson" (NBC, 1958-61) really marked his transition to small-screen fame. It also cannily utilized and strongly consolidated the image of the dandy that had previously appeared as part of Barry's star persona. Bat's derby hat, gold-tipped cane and tailored outfits were trademarks of a series that, like the contemporaneous "Maverick", downplayed action in favor of wit in glamorizing the legendary lawman-gambler.

Barry's next series carved an even more prominent niche in popular culture. "Burke's Law" (ABC, 1963-65), revamped for a third season as "Amos Burke, Secret Agent" (1965-66), told of the dashing, middle-aged head of the homicide bureau of the L.A. Police Department, who also happened to be a multi-millionaire. The last season was even more escapist as Capt. Burke left the police force to become an undercover FBI agent exposing organized crime. Barry continued his run of hit shows with "The Name of the Game" (NBC, 1968-71), which told the exploits of three men working for "Crime" magazine, with Barry in typical form as the tabloid's publisher dealing stylishly with high-level intrigue.

A fourth series, "The Adventurer" (syndicated, 1972) unsuccessfully rehashed earlier Barry programs as wealthy businessman Gene Bradley posed as a film star while working as a spy. Barry's subsequent TV work was mostly in TV-movies ("Ransom for Alice!" 1977, "A Cry for Love" 1980), and miniseries ("Aspen" 1977), but for a time he took to movie producing. He set up the Barry Film Company and executive produced a feature directed by his son Michael. "The Second Coming of Sarah" (1974), based on a Leonard Cohen song about a female Christ-like figure, was surprisingly experimental and showed definite filmmaking talent by all concerned, but was hardly the type of film able to garner much exposure.

Barry's next turn in the spotlight came in 1983 in yet another medium, the Broadway stage, with the smash musical "La Cage aux Folles". The show capitalized beautifully, if a bit stereotypically, on his images as both a smooth, manly romancer with a past and a self-mocking, slightly prettified dandy as he played a gay man who must meet his son's prospective in-laws. Barry stayed with the show for a long time and later recreated his Bat Masterson for the two-part TV-movie "Luck of the Draw: The Gambler Returns" (1991). He reprised another famous role when CBS revived "Burke's Law" (1994-95), as a new series, with Amos' son helping his father fight crime, and joined Elizabeth Taylor, Shirley MacLaine, Debbie Reynolds and Joan Collins for the amusing, Carrie Fisher-penned telepic "These Old Broads" (ABC, 2001). Still looking fit and dashing in his mid-80s, Barry made a brief but welcome return to feature films with a cameo in Steven Spielberg's rivieting remake of "War of the Worlds" (2005), playing Tom Cruise's ex-father-in-law.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
2.
 These Old Broads (2001) Mr Stern
3.
 Turn Back the Clock (1989) John Forrest
4.
 Perry Mason: The Case of the Lost Love (1987) Glen Kilgallen
5.
 Cry For Love, A (1980) Gordon Harris
6.
 Guyana: Cult of the Damned (1979) Congressman Lee O'Brien
7.
 Adventures of Nellie Bly, The (1979) John Cockerill
8.
 Ransom For Alice! (1977) Harry Darew
9.
 Second Coming of Suzanne, The (1974) Tv Commentator
10.
 Do You Take This Stranger? (1971) Murray Jarvis
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1942:
First appeared on Broadway
1952:
Signed by Paramount; played in first Hollywood film in the leading role in "The Atomic City"
1953:
Played the male lead in what is probably his best-remembered feature film, "The War of the Worlds"
1955:
First TV series in a regular role, "Our Miss Brooks"; played physical education teacher Gene Talbot on the last season of the CBS sitcom starring Eve Arden
1958:
Last feature film for nearly a decade, "Hong Kong Confidential"
:
Played the title role on the NBC Western series, "Bat Masterson"
1962:
Returned to Broadway to act in the play, "The Perfect Setup"
:
Played the eponymous role of Capt. Amos Burke on the ABC police detective series, "Burke's Law"
:
Played Amos Burke on the ABC crime drama semi-spinoff, "Amos Burke, Secret Agent"
1967:
Returned to feature films to play a leading role opposite Cyd Charisse in his first non-US feature, the British-made film, "Maroc 7"
1968:
First TV-movie, "Prescription: Murder", the first of two pilots for the NBC detective mystery series, "Columbo", starring Peter Falk
:
Played Glenn Howard on the NBC adventure series, "The Name of the Game"
1972:
Starred as agent Gene Bradley on the syndicated spy series, "The Adventurer"
:
Founded own production company, the Barry Film Company, in the early 1970s
1974:
Executive produced a feature film, "The Second Coming of Suzanne", directed by Barry's son Michael and based on a song by Leonard Cohen; also acted a role in the film
1977:
Acted in first TV miniseries, "Aspen"
1978:
Performed in the stage musical, "Spotlight"
1979:
Last feature film credit to date, the docudrama, "Guyana: Cult of the Damned"
1983:
Opened on Broadway in one of the two leading roles of the hit musical, "La Cage aux Folles"; was nominated for a Tony as Best Leading Actor in a Musical, but lost to his co-star George Hearn
1991:
Recreated TV series role as Bat Masterson for the two-part NBC Western miniseries, "Luck of the Draw: The Gambler Returns"
:
Recreated the role of Amos Burke for the CBS police detective series, "Burke's Law"
1999:
Performed a cabaret act in NYC
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Notes

Some sources list 1921 as the year of Mr. Barry's birth.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Betty Claire Kalb. Married on October 22, 1944.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Martin Klass.
mother:
Eva Klass.
son:
Michael Lewis Barry. Born c. 1946; when Gene Barry formed the Barry Film Company in the early 1970s, his son served as a director; directed the feature "The Second Coming of Suzanne" (1974).
son:
Fredric James Barry.
daughter:
Elizabeth Barry.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

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