skip navigation
Rick Hoffman

Rick Hoffman

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

The Condemned (Fullscreen)... It's a fight to the death for 10 modern-day gladiators, in "The Condemned"... more info $9.98was $9.98 Buy Now

Blood Work DVD FBI profiler Terry McCaleb almost always gets to the heart of a case. This time,... more info $5.98was $5.98 Buy Now

Hostel: Director's Cut... Dreams turn to nightmares for Jay Hernandez and Derek Richardson in Eli Roth's... more info $9.99was $9.99 Buy Now

The Condemned / Bloodsport 4 / Lock-Up /... Keep your guns at the ready for this 3-disc action-filled collection! "The... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

The Condemned Blu-ray MORE > $14.98 Regularly $14.98 Buy Now blu-ray



Also Known As: Died:
Born: Cause of Death:
Birth Place: Profession: actor, waiter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A dark-haired, deep-voiced actor with looks and talent more befitting a risk-taking character player than a white bread leading man, Rick Hoffman worked steadily in bit parts from his 1997 debut, but only stopped waiting tables when, in 2000, he landed a regular role on the doomed Fox drama "The $treet". A Long Island native who studied drama at the University of Arizona in Tucson and headed to Los Angeles to pursue a career, Hoffman was so nervous while filming his brief role in 1997's "Conspiracy Theory" that he blew his lines. Luckily, his misread got laughs, was included in the final draft and got the actor some much-needed attention. That same year he had guest roles in the series "The Pretender" (NBC) and "Alright Already" (The WB). In 1998, he was featured as a bartender in the noirish "Johnny Skidmarks", an independent feature aired on HBO in lieu of theatrical release, and had a small role as a police officer in "Lethal Weapon 4". 1999 saw him take the role of Benji in an episode of the NBC hit drama "Providence", while the actor added another small role on the big screen to his resume with a turn as a doctor in the comedy "What Planet Are You From?" (2000). In November of that year,...

A dark-haired, deep-voiced actor with looks and talent more befitting a risk-taking character player than a white bread leading man, Rick Hoffman worked steadily in bit parts from his 1997 debut, but only stopped waiting tables when, in 2000, he landed a regular role on the doomed Fox drama "The $treet". A Long Island native who studied drama at the University of Arizona in Tucson and headed to Los Angeles to pursue a career, Hoffman was so nervous while filming his brief role in 1997's "Conspiracy Theory" that he blew his lines. Luckily, his misread got laughs, was included in the final draft and got the actor some much-needed attention. That same year he had guest roles in the series "The Pretender" (NBC) and "Alright Already" (The WB).

In 1998, he was featured as a bartender in the noirish "Johnny Skidmarks", an independent feature aired on HBO in lieu of theatrical release, and had a small role as a police officer in "Lethal Weapon 4". 1999 saw him take the role of Benji in an episode of the NBC hit drama "Providence", while the actor added another small role on the big screen to his resume with a turn as a doctor in the comedy "What Planet Are You From?" (2000). In November of that year, Hoffman made quite an impression in his regular series debut, shocking viewers as the despicable stockbroker Freddie Sacker, an "equal opportunity offender", on "The $treet", a Wall Street-set drama that came to a quick end thanks in part to dialogue fueled by too many mentions of Ivy League MBAs and not enough real character development. Though the show came and went in a flash, Hoffman's performance of the slimy Sacker stayed with many who watched the series.

When the following fall came around, Hoffman and co-star Tom Everett Scott had been picked up for roles in the ABC courtroom drama "Philly", and many TV fans were anxious to see just what kind of characterization Hoffman would bring to his assistant district attorney character. Hoffman's skilled character work continued in a string of film roles, including a turn in actor Adam Goldberg's directorial debut "I Love Your Work" (2003) and an uproarious scene-stealing role as a fast-talking, shallow-minded carjacking victim in the thriller "Cellular" (2004).

The actor enoyed a pair of recurring television roles on "The Practice" and "The Bernie Mac Show," both in 2004, before landing his most amusing role to date as the verbose magician/performance artist Patrick, who becomes one of the pals of the slick ladies' man Jake (John Stamos) on the ABC comedy "Jake In Progress" (2005 - ).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Locker 13 (2014)
2.
 Battleship (2012)
3.
 Smiley Face (2007)
4.
 Hostel: Part II (2007)
5.
 Condemned, The (2007)
6.
 Hostel (2006)
7.
 Cellular (2004) Lawyer
9.
 Blood Work (2002) James Lockridge
10.
 Better Way to Die, A (2000) Regis
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

:
Raised in Roslyn Heights, New York
:
Attended the University of Arizona
:
Moved to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career
1997:
Made screen debut with small role as a security guard in "Conspiracy Theory"
1997:
Had guest roles on the series "The Pretender" (NBC) and "Alright Already" (The WB)
1998:
Played a bartender in the thriller "Johnny Skidmarks" (aired on HBO in lieu of theatrical release)
1998:
Had a cameo as a police officer in "Lethal Weapon 4"
1999:
Guested on an episode of "Providence" (NBC)
2000:
Appeared in "What Planet Are You From?"
2000:
Featured in "A Better Way to Die" (aired on HBO)
2000:
Was finally able to quit waiting tables when he learned he was hired as a regular on the Wall Street-set series "The $treet"; relocated to NYC from Los Angeles
2000:
Had regular role of an offensive stockbroker on "The $treet" (Fox)
2001:
Reunited with "The $treet" co-star Tom Everett Scott in the ABC fall drama series "Philly"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

University of Arizona: Tucson , Arizona -

Notes

Hoffman on Freddie Sacker, his wildly chauvinistic character on "The $treet": "The more insults I get, the happier I get."

"Personally, that kind of guy makes me ill, but I will say that playing him is fun because I find it interesting to explore what's underneath to cause all that anger and hurt." --to Daily Variety, October 24, 2000.

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute