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Carole King

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A MusiCares Tribute to Carole... On January 24, 2014, Carole King was honored as the 2014 MusiCares Person of the... more info $19.95was $21.98 Buy Now

A MusiCares Tribute to Carole... On January 24, 2014, Carole King was honored as the 2014 MusiCares Person of the... more info $15.95was $16.98 Buy Now

Head ... Newly remastered from the original film elements into full frame with animated a... more info $14.95was $19.95 Buy Now

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

tured the Song of the Year Grammy. It would go on to sell 25 million copies worldwide, and have a significant influence on the growing singer-songwriter movement.King¿s follow-up, Music, would hit shelves at the end of her extraordinary year in 1971, and while not as overwhelming a success as Tapestry, the record hit No. 1 on New Year¿s Day in 1972 and would remain there for the next three weeks on the strength of its hit single, "Sweet Seasons." There was a brief dip with 1972¿s Rhymes and Reasons (1972) and 1973¿s Fantasy, which reached No. 2 and No. 6, respectively, but King rebounded with Wrap Around Joy (1974), which became her third No. 1 album via the Top Five single "Jazzman." King also mounted her first national tour behind the album, which ran until 1975. That year, she teamed with celebrated children¿s author Maurice Sendak to provide the songs and music for "Really Rosie" (1975), an animated primetime special for CBS that became a beloved childhood memory for many young viewers who grew up during the decade.King had continued to work sporadically with Goffin in the years following their divorce, but her 1976 album Thoroughbred would mark their first full-length collaboration since the...

tured the Song of the Year Grammy. It would go on to sell 25 million copies worldwide, and have a significant influence on the growing singer-songwriter movement.

King¿s follow-up, Music, would hit shelves at the end of her extraordinary year in 1971, and while not as overwhelming a success as Tapestry, the record hit No. 1 on New Year¿s Day in 1972 and would remain there for the next three weeks on the strength of its hit single, "Sweet Seasons." There was a brief dip with 1972¿s Rhymes and Reasons (1972) and 1973¿s Fantasy, which reached No. 2 and No. 6, respectively, but King rebounded with Wrap Around Joy (1974), which became her third No. 1 album via the Top Five single "Jazzman." King also mounted her first national tour behind the album, which ran until 1975. That year, she teamed with celebrated children¿s author Maurice Sendak to provide the songs and music for "Really Rosie" (1975), an animated primetime special for CBS that became a beloved childhood memory for many young viewers who grew up during the decade.

King had continued to work sporadically with Goffin in the years following their divorce, but her 1976 album Thoroughbred would mark their first full-length collaboration since the late 1960s. The album, which rose to No. 6, featured an array of her celebrity admirers and friends, including Taylor, David Crosby, Graham Nash and J.D. Souther. However, it would be her last Top 10 album for the next three decades. Audience interest in the singer-songwriter sound had begun to wane at the end of the 1970s when disco was king, and her subsequent efforts of the decade, including 1977¿s Simple Things, failed to break the Top 40. There was a brief tour behind the record, and a 1977 marriage to songwriter Rick Evers, who died of a heroin overdose a year later. The downward spiral of King¿s career continued with both Welcome Home (1978) and Touch the Sky (1979), neither of which were unable to even break the Top 100. There was also an unflattering portrait of King in the 1978 film "American Hot Wax," which featured a gawky, overachieving character named "Teenage Louse," played by "Saturday Night Live" (NBC, 1975- ) veteran Laraine Newman. Her final chart hit for nearly three decades came with a new version of her 1963 single "One Fine Day," which appeared on Pearls (1980), a compilation of her work with Goffin.

King would record only sporadically throughout the 1980s, releasing just three albums between 1982 and 1989. Neither 1982¿s One on One or Speeding Time (1983) found many willing listeners, so King focused her energies on songs for motion picture soundtracks. Her best work in this area was 1985¿s Murphy¿s Romance, which featured a collaboration with saxophonist David Sanborn, though an official soundtrack was never released. The film, which starred James Garner and Sally Field, also marked King¿s debut as an actress, and she went on to tackle stage work in "Blood Brothers" and Neil Simon¿s "Brighton Beach Memoirs." After King and Goffin¿s rich history was paid proper tribute by their induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1987 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990, the end of the 20th century saw King return to songwriting with a renewed vigor, penning the Grammy-nominated song "Now and Forever" for "A League of Their Own" (1992) and teaming with Mariah Carey for the single "If It¿s Over" that same year.

In 1996, King¿s life and career served as the inspiration for Allison Anders¿ music industry drama "Grace of My Heart." Ileana Douglas played the ersatz King, an aspiring songwriter who endured professional triumphs and personal tragedies before finally recording her own album, a Tapestry soundalike. Several figures from King¿s history, including Goffin and Phil Spector, were also presented in thinly veiled depictions by Eric Stoltz and John Turturro, respectively. The real King, however, found herself in the early stages of a career revival, which began with "The Reason," a song she wrote for Celine Dion. A worldwide smash hit, she performed it with Dion on the first "VH1 Divas" (1998-2004, 2009- ) special, which also featured her duet with Dion, Gloria Estefan and Shania Twain on "You¿ve Got a Friend." In 2000, King was introduced to a new generation of listeners via the WB drama "Gilmore Girls" (2000-07), which featured a new version of the Tapestry track "Where You Lead" performed by King and her daughter, Louise Goffin, as its theme song. King also made several appearances on the show as a music storeowner.

In 2001, she recorded Love Makes the World, her first album since 1989¿s City Streets. Released on her own label, Rockingale, it reached No. 20 on Billboard¿s Internet albums chart. Three years later, after she and Goffin received the Grammy Trustees Award, she launched The Living Room Tour, a national tour that saw King revisiting her greatest hits with only piano and guitar accompaniment. A live album, also titled The Living Room Tour rose to No. 17 on the Billboard albums chart, her highest placement there since 1977. With interest in her best work now at an all-time high, King played to increasingly large audiences across North American through 2006. A 2007 tour through Japan saw her on equal billing with two bonafide 21st century superstars, Mary J. Blige and Fergie from The Black Eyed Peas.

But the heights achieved by her solo tour did not begin to match the overwhelming response to her 2010 reunion with James Taylor to celebrate their first performance together at the Troubadour in 1970. A 2008 date at the club to mark its 50th anniversary was a surprise pleasure for both singers, and they soon launched the Troubadour Reunion Tour, which also featured Danny Kortchmar, bassist Leland Sklar and drummer Russ Kunkel, who served as Taylor¿s backing band in the Troubadour days. The tour was an unqualified success, amassing over $59 million in ticket sales, which made it one of the most successful live shows of the year, while a live album documenting their first reunion in 2008 called Live at the Troubadour rose to No. 4 on the Billboard charts. In 2011, King released A Holiday Carole, which featured seasonal standards and new songs co-written with her daughter, Louise, who also produced the record.

By Paul Gaitailed to make an impact on the charts, despite excellent reviews from Rolling Stone magazine. But Writer was a landmark in King¿s career because it marked her first recorded collaboration with Danny Kortchmar¿s childhood friend, James Taylor, who at the time was an up-and-coming songwriter attempting to carve out a career after a dismal debut on the Beatles¿ Apple Records and stints with drug abuse and mental illness. Taylor was one of King¿s most passionate performers, but who also encouraged her to sing her own material. To aid her with her stage fright, he frequently invited her to perform her own songs with his band at L.A.¿s famed Troubadour club.

King marshaled her creative forces for her next album, which proved to be her starmaking effort as a singer. Tapestry, released in 1971, was a gentle, reflective album, with a track list of new songs and older material from her songwriting past, wrapped in the warmth and strength of King¿s imperfect but impassioned voice. Two of its singles, the ruminative "It¿s Too Late" and the funkier "I Feel the Earth Move," rose to No. 1 on both the pop and adult contemporary charts, with the album itself following suit on the Billboard 200 for 15 weeks ¿ the longest residency at that position for a female artist in music history. It also provided a No. 1 single for Taylor, who released his version of "You¿ve Got a Friend" the same year as Tapestry. The album would go on to win four Grammys, including Album of the Year, while Taylor¿s cover of "Friend" cap

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Russkies (1987)
2.
 Murphy's Romance (1985) Tillie
3.
 46th Annual Grammy Awards, The (2004) Presenter
4.
 United We Stand (2001)
6.
7.
 100 Greatest Albums of Rock & Roll (2001) Interviewee
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