skip navigation
Richard Kiley

Richard Kiley

Up
Down

| VIEW ALL

TCM Messageboards
Post your comments here
ADD YOUR COMMENT>

share:

TCM Archive Materials VIEW ALL ARCHIVES (0)

Recent DVDs

 
 

If Tomorrow Comes DVD One of the bestselling novelists of all time, Sidney Sheldon, crafted this... more info $19.98was $19.98 Buy Now

Blackboard Jungle DVD "Blackboard Jungle" (1955) is a drama revolving around the plight of teachers in... more info $4.99was $19.98 Buy Now

The Canterville Ghost DVD Richard Kiley, Shelly Fabares and Mary Wickes star, in this Wonderworks series... more info $6.95was $6.95 Buy Now

Columbia Pictures Film Noir Classics I... In the 1940s, a new genre - film noir - emerged from the world of hard -... more info $65.99was $65.99 Buy Now

Gunsmoke: The Last Apache... James Arness reprises his role as Marshall Matt Dillon in this second movie... more info $14.98was $14.98 Buy Now

Pickup On South Street: The Criterion... A pickpocket finds himself in possession of top secret microfilm and on the run... more info $19.99was $29.95 Buy Now



Also Known As: Richard Paul Kiley Died: March 5, 1999
Born: March 31, 1922 Cause of Death: myleodysplasia
Birth Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA Profession: actor, narrator, singer

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A legendary stage actor and musical star who has also won Emmy awards for his TV work, Richard Kiley had one of the best "voices" in the business--mellifluous and warmly authoritarian--which complemented his wide acting range. He began his career in his native Chicago, performing juvenile role on radio soap operas such as the famed "Ma Perkins" and "The Guiding Light". After military service, Kiley settled in NYC to pursue a stage career. His first break came when he was tapped to replace Anthony Quinn as Stanley Kowalski in the road company of "A Streetcar Named Desire". In 1953, Kiley made his Broadway debut in a revival of George Bernard Shaw's "Misalliance", for which he received a Theatre World Award. Turning to musicals, the actor displayed his vocal abilities as the Caliph in "Kismet" (introducing songs such as "Stranger in Paradise"), earned his first Tony Award co-starring with Gwen Verdon in the musical thriller "Redhead" (1959) and went on to alternate in dramas (e.g., "Advise and Consent") and musicals (i.e., Richard Rodgers' "No Strings"). But it was in the 1965 production of "Man of La Mancha", in which Kiley played the dual roles of Cervantes and Don Quixote, that solidified his...

A legendary stage actor and musical star who has also won Emmy awards for his TV work, Richard Kiley had one of the best "voices" in the business--mellifluous and warmly authoritarian--which complemented his wide acting range. He began his career in his native Chicago, performing juvenile role on radio soap operas such as the famed "Ma Perkins" and "The Guiding Light". After military service, Kiley settled in NYC to pursue a stage career. His first break came when he was tapped to replace Anthony Quinn as Stanley Kowalski in the road company of "A Streetcar Named Desire". In 1953, Kiley made his Broadway debut in a revival of George Bernard Shaw's "Misalliance", for which he received a Theatre World Award. Turning to musicals, the actor displayed his vocal abilities as the Caliph in "Kismet" (introducing songs such as "Stranger in Paradise"), earned his first Tony Award co-starring with Gwen Verdon in the musical thriller "Redhead" (1959) and went on to alternate in dramas (e.g., "Advise and Consent") and musicals (i.e., Richard Rodgers' "No Strings"). But it was in the 1965 production of "Man of La Mancha", in which Kiley played the dual roles of Cervantes and Don Quixote, that solidified his theatrical stardom and provided him with a signature role. He introduced "The Impossible Dream" not only on the New York stage but also in London in 1969, and on numerous TV variety shows, including "The Ed Sullivan Show". Kiley would later also star on Broadway in the comedy "Absurd Person Singular" and in a revival of "All My Sons", but he would periodically return to "Man of La Mancha".

As with most NYC-based actors in the 50s, Kiley began his small screen career in live productions, but it was not until he had reached middle-age that his TV work increased momentum. He won his first Emmy for his portrayal of the patriarch of an Australian family in the ABC miniseries "The Thorn Birds" in 1983. Kiley went on to earn raves as the husband of a woman (Joanne Woodward) diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in "Do You Remember Love?" (CBS, 1985). He was another patriarch a widower coping with life alone and helping his children stabilize their own lives, in the award-winning miniseries "A Year on the Life" (NBC, 1986) and its spin-off (NBC, 1987-88), which earned him a second Emmy. After making recurring appearances on NBC's "The Cosby Mysteries" (1994-95), Kiley earned a third Emmy for his turn as the irascible father of Jill Brock (Kathy Baker) in an episode of the CBS drama "Picket Fences".

Kiley's film work was more sporadic. He made his debut in 1951 in "The Mob", was a supporting player to Richard Widmark in the excellent spy thriller "Pickup on South Street" (1953) and as the member of the faculty who thinks he can reason with the hoodlums in "The Blackboard Jungle" (1955). After the 50s, his film appearances became infrequent. Among his more notable later roles were the pilot in the screen musical version of "The Little Prince" (1974), Diane Keaton's ill-tempered father in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar" (1977) and a doctor in "Patch Adams" (1998, his final film).

Often, the actor could be heard rather than seen, employing his sonorous baritone as a narrator. For instance. Kiley could be heard as the tour voice in "Jurassic Park" (1993) and in numerous TV commercials. He also provided the narration for documentary programming, including "National Geographic Specials", "Nova", "Planet Earth" as well as hundreds of nature, historical, and informative specials and reality shows on public television, broadcast networks, and cable channels (e.g., The Discovery Channel, The Learning Channel).

VIEW THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Filmographyclose complete filmography

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Blue Moon (1999) Jimmy Keating
2.
 Patch Adams (1998) Dr Titan
3.
 Time to Say Goodbye? (1997) Gerry Klooster
4.
 Phenomenon (1996) Dr Wellin
5.
 Mary & Tim (1996) Ron Melville
6.
8.
 Secrets (1995) Will Berter
9.
 Cosby Mysteries, The (1994) Sears Cushing
VIEW THE FULL FILMOGRAPHY

Milestones close milestones

1941:
Played juvenile in radio soap operas, "Ma Perkins" and "The Guiding Light"
:
Was gunnery instructor in the US Navy
1947:
Off-Broadway debut, "The Trojan Women"
:
Understudied Anthony Quinn and later played Stanley Kowalski in road company of "A Streetcar Named Desire"
1951:
Film debut, "The Mob"
1953:
Broadway debut, "Misalliance"
1953:
TV debut, "U.S. Steel Hour"
1953:
First musical role, "Kismet"
1959:
Starred as Tom Baxter in "Redhead" on Broadway; won Tony Award
1965:
Created signature role as Don Quixote/Miguel Cervantes in "Man of La Mancha" on Broadway; won second Tony Award; appeared with the show for its five year run, playing over 2,000 performances in the role
1972:
Headlined a revival of "Man of La Mancha"
1974:
Played the Pilot in the film musical "The Little Prince"
1977:
Co-starred as Mr. Dunn, Diane Keaton's father, in "Looking for Mr. Goodbar"
1977:
Once again played his signature role in yet another revival of "Man of La Mancha"
1981:
Appeared as Martin Hewitt's father in "Endless Love"
1982:
Portrayed the patriarch of the Cleary family in the ABC miniseries "The Thorn Birds"; earned an Emmy Award
1985:
Portrayed the husband of Joanne Woodward in "Do You Remember Love?", a drama about a married couple facing Alzheimer's disease
1986:
Created role of widower patriarch Joe Gardner in the NBC miniseries "A Year in the Life"
:
Reprised his role of Joe Gardner in the NBC spin-off series "A Year in the Life"; won Emmy Award
1987:
Portrayed lead role of Joe Keller in Broadway revival of Arthur Miller's "All My Sons"; marked final Broadway appearance
1992:
First played role of Hayden Langston, father of Jill Brock (Kathy Baker) in "Picket Fences" (CBS); teleplay by David E Kelley
1993:
Provided the voice of the tour guide in "Jurassic Park"
1994:
Reprised guest role as Hayden Langston in an episode of "Picket Fences" scripted by Kelley; received Emmy Award
:
Narrated "Search for Lost Worlds" series for the Discovery Channel
1998:
Last TV acting role before his death, portrayed a painter in an episode of "Ally McBeal" (Fox), written by David E Kelley
1998:
Final film appearance, as a doctor in the hit "Patch Adams"
1999:
Final acting role, as Sharon Lawrence's restarauteur father in the CBS movie "Blue Moon"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

Education

Loyola Academy: Chicago , Illinois - 1940
Barnum Dramatic School: Chicago , Illinois - 1941 - 1942

Notes

Inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame in 1999.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Mary Bell Wood. Married in 1948; divorced in 1967; died on March 3, 1993 at the age of 65; had six children with Kiley.
wife:
Patricia Ferrier. Married from 1968 until Kiley's death.

Family close complete family listing

father:
Leo Joseph Kiley. Railroad statistician.
mother:
Leonore Kiley.
son:
David Kiley. Survived him.
son:
Michael Kiley. Survived him.
daughter:
Kathleen Kiley. Survived him.
daughter:
Dorothea Kiley. Survived him.
daughter:
Erin Kiley. Survived him.
daughter:
Dierdre Kiley. Survived him.
VIEW COMPLETE FAMILY LISTING

Please support TCMDB by adding to this information.

Click here to contribute