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Krzysztof Kieslowski

Krzysztof Kieslowski

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Also Known As: Died: March 13, 1996
Born: June 27, 1941 Cause of Death: heart attack following bypass operation
Birth Place: Poland Profession: director, screenwriter

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

A leading Polish director who achieved international acclaim from behind the Iron Curtain, Krzysztof Kieslowski began his career by making documentaries that focused on the cultural, political and economic problems of Poland during the waning days of the Soviet Union. Having grown up under both Nazi and Stalinist rule, Kieslowski naturally gravitated toward the political and often remained at odds with authority, while at the same time relying on state financing to make his films. In the mid-1970s, he began moving away from documentaries toward narrative filmmaking and keeping his focus on political themes. Kieslowski rose to international fame late in the decade with "Camera Buff" (1979) and solidified his status as a powerhouse filmmaker with "Blind Chance" (1981) and "No End" (1984). But it was on Polish television that he was able to make his greatest achievement, "The Decalogue" (1988), a film cycle of 10 one-hour films that adapted each of the Ten Commandments into a modern fictional story. Universally acclaimed, the series won numerous awards and became a staple of film school classrooms the world over. Kieslowski next directed his most conventional art house film, "The Double Life of...

A leading Polish director who achieved international acclaim from behind the Iron Curtain, Krzysztof Kieslowski began his career by making documentaries that focused on the cultural, political and economic problems of Poland during the waning days of the Soviet Union. Having grown up under both Nazi and Stalinist rule, Kieslowski naturally gravitated toward the political and often remained at odds with authority, while at the same time relying on state financing to make his films. In the mid-1970s, he began moving away from documentaries toward narrative filmmaking and keeping his focus on political themes. Kieslowski rose to international fame late in the decade with "Camera Buff" (1979) and solidified his status as a powerhouse filmmaker with "Blind Chance" (1981) and "No End" (1984). But it was on Polish television that he was able to make his greatest achievement, "The Decalogue" (1988), a film cycle of 10 one-hour films that adapted each of the Ten Commandments into a modern fictional story. Universally acclaimed, the series won numerous awards and became a staple of film school classrooms the world over. Kieslowski next directed his most conventional art house film, "The Double Life of Veronique" (1991), which also brought him his greatest success. With his famed "Three Colors" trilogy - "Blue" (1993), "White" (1993) and "Red" (1994) - Kieslowski cemented his place as a towering figure of European cinema whose influence stretched across the globe.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Short Working Day, A (1997) Director
2.
  White (1994) Director
3.
  Red (1994) Director
4.
  Blue (1993) Director
5.
6.
  City Life (1990) Director (Warsaw - "Seven Days A Week")
7.
  Dekalog 10 (1989) Director
8.
  Dekalog 3 (1989) Director
9.
  Dekalog 7 (1989) Director
10.
  Dekalog 9 (1989) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Our Hollywood Education (1992) Himself
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Milestones close milestones

1969:
Short film directing debut, "Z miasta Lodzi/From the City of Lodz"
1973:
Feature film writing and directing debut, "Pedestrian Subway"
1990:
Contributed a segment to the 11-part anthology drama, "City Life"; each segment had a different director and Kieslowski's contribution was set in Warsaw and entitled "Seven Days a Week"
1991:
First international feature co-production, "The Double Life of Veronique", a French-Polish co-production
1993:
Began making trilogy of films interrelated thematically; first film, "Blue", followed by "White" and "Red"
1994:
Announced retirement from filmmaking at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival
1995:
Sufferred a heart attack while at vacation home in northern Poland
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Education

Lodz State Theatrical and Film College: - 1969

Notes

"He was a great artist, of great honesty and friendliness" --Polish director Krysztof Zanussi quoted by CNN on learning of Kieslowski's death.

Companions close complete companion listing

wife:
Maria Kieslowski. Designer. Survived him.

Family close complete family listing

daughter:
Marta Kieslowski. Survived him.

Bibliography close complete biography

"Double Lives, Second Chances: The Cinema of Krzystof Kieslowski" Talk Miramax/Hyperion

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