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Ralph Kemplen

Ralph Kemplen

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: October 8, 1912 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: London, England, GB Profession: editor, director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

London-born Ralph Kemplen began his career as a teenager working on silent films like "The Return of the Rat" (1929). He also worked on the partial sound feature, "Balaclava/The Jaws of Hell" (1930) before receiving his first screen credit for "Frightened Lady" (1932). After working for the British Ministry of Information editing documentaries during WWII, Kemplen came into his own as an editor in the 1950s, particularly with his work for John Huston. His deft cutting of "The African Queen" (1951) particularly enhanced the endemic tension of the numerous hazards of the journey. He and Huston went on to work on "Moulin Rouge" (1952), which brought Kemplen the first of three Oscar nominations, "Beat the Devil" (1953), "Freud" (1962) and "The Bible" (1966). Other notable films to which he contributed were Fred Zinneman's Oscar-winning "A Man for All Seasons" (1966) and "The Day of the Jackal" (1972), Carol Reed's musical "Oliver!" (1968) and Jim Henson's "The Great Muppet Caper" (1981). Kemplen also directed one film, "The Spaniard's Curse" (1958).

London-born Ralph Kemplen began his career as a teenager working on silent films like "The Return of the Rat" (1929). He also worked on the partial sound feature, "Balaclava/The Jaws of Hell" (1930) before receiving his first screen credit for "Frightened Lady" (1932). After working for the British Ministry of Information editing documentaries during WWII, Kemplen came into his own as an editor in the 1950s, particularly with his work for John Huston. His deft cutting of "The African Queen" (1951) particularly enhanced the endemic tension of the numerous hazards of the journey. He and Huston went on to work on "Moulin Rouge" (1952), which brought Kemplen the first of three Oscar nominations, "Beat the Devil" (1953), "Freud" (1962) and "The Bible" (1966). Other notable films to which he contributed were Fred Zinneman's Oscar-winning "A Man for All Seasons" (1966) and "The Day of the Jackal" (1972), Carol Reed's musical "Oliver!" (1968) and Jim Henson's "The Great Muppet Caper" (1981). Kemplen also directed one film, "The Spaniard's Curse" (1958).

Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
  Spaniard's Curse, The (1958) Director

CAST: (feature film)

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Milestones close milestones

:
After dropping out of school, found work at Gainsborough Studios
1929:
Worked on the crew for the silent "Return of the Rat"
1932:
First credit as editor, "Frightened Lady"
:
Worked as editor of documentaries for the British Ministry of Information during WWII
1952:
Received first of three Oscar nominations for John Huston's "Moulin Rouge"
1968:
Nominated for a Best Editing Oscar for "Oliver!"
1972:
Received third Oscar nomination for "The Day of the Jackal"
1982:
Final film, "The Dark Crystal"
VIEW ALL MILESTONES

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