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Paul Haggis

Paul Haggis

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Also Known As: Died:
Born: March 10, 1953 Cause of Death:
Birth Place: London, Ontario, CA Profession: screenwriter, producer, director

Biography CLOSE THE FULL BIOGRAPHY

Despite getting his start as a sitcom writer on more than one embarrassing show, writer-director Paul Haggis earned a hard-fought-for career in Hollywood which culminated in winning Academy Awards for his biting racial drama, "Crash" (2005). Prior to his Oscar triumph, Haggis spent years writing for popular, but unchallenging sitcoms like "Diff'rent Strokes" (NBC/ABC, 1978-1986), "One Day at a Time" (CBS, 1975-1984) and "The Facts of Life" (NBC, 1979-1988). Eventually, he transitioned from sitcoms to more respectable one-hour dramas, adding "thirtysomething" (ABC, 1987-1991) and "L.A. Law" (NBC, 1986-1994) to his growing television resume. After seeing several of his own pet projects summarily axed for poor ratings despite being of good quality, Haggis found a rebirth in film, receiving an Oscar nomination for his brutal, honest drama, "Million Dollar Baby" (2004) starring Clint Eastwood and Hilary Swank. He continued working with director Eastwood on "Flags of Our Fathers" (2006) and its companion piece "Letters from Iwo Jima" (2006); the latter earning him another Academy Award nod. But it was his second directing effort, "Crash," that earned Haggis the most acclaim - and in some cases criticism...

Despite getting his start as a sitcom writer on more than one embarrassing show, writer-director Paul Haggis earned a hard-fought-for career in Hollywood which culminated in winning Academy Awards for his biting racial drama, "Crash" (2005). Prior to his Oscar triumph, Haggis spent years writing for popular, but unchallenging sitcoms like "Diff'rent Strokes" (NBC/ABC, 1978-1986), "One Day at a Time" (CBS, 1975-1984) and "The Facts of Life" (NBC, 1979-1988). Eventually, he transitioned from sitcoms to more respectable one-hour dramas, adding "thirtysomething" (ABC, 1987-1991) and "L.A. Law" (NBC, 1986-1994) to his growing television resume. After seeing several of his own pet projects summarily axed for poor ratings despite being of good quality, Haggis found a rebirth in film, receiving an Oscar nomination for his brutal, honest drama, "Million Dollar Baby" (2004) starring Clint Eastwood and Hilary Swank. He continued working with director Eastwood on "Flags of Our Fathers" (2006) and its companion piece "Letters from Iwo Jima" (2006); the latter earning him another Academy Award nod. But it was his second directing effort, "Crash," that earned Haggis the most acclaim - and in some cases criticism for its simplified views on race - as well as his first Oscar, taking the filmmaker as far away from his days on "The Facts of Life" as possible.

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Filmographyclose complete filmography

DIRECTOR:

1.
5.
  Crash (2005) Director
7.
  Deadly Reunion (1995) Creator
8.
  Red Hot (1993) Director

CAST: (feature film)

1.
 Casting By (2013)
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Milestones close milestones

:
Penned his first play, based on C.S. Lewis' Narnia Chronicles; sister Kathy, then an actress, portrayed the witch
:
Moved to Hollywood at the age of 22 to become a writer
:
Wrote the pilot for the Canadian sitcom "Hangin' In"
1975:
Hired as a writer for the CBS series "One Day at a Time"
:
Worked as a writer for "The Love Boat" (ABC) and "Diff'rent Strokes" (NBC)
1984:
Wrote for the ABC series "Who's the Boss" starring Judith Light and Tony Danza
1984:
Worked as executive producer and writer for the series "The Facts of Life" (NBC)
1986:
Wrote for David E. Kelley's "L.A. Law" (NBC)
1987:
Became the supervising producer and writer for the award winning ABC series "thirtysomething"
1990:
Signed with MTM Productions and created "City," the short-lived Valerie Harper CBS series
1993:
Created the CBS series "Walker, Texas Ranger," starring Chuck Norris
1994:
Wrote and directed the short-lived CBS series "Due South," originally a made-for-TV movie on CBS
1996:
Created the CBS drama "EZ Streets," a dark, ambiguous Mob tale starring Ken Olin and Joe Pantonliano
1999:
Helmed the CBS series "Family Law," starring Kathleen Quinlan
2003:
Worked on the NBC series "Mr. Sterling," a political drama which starred Josh Brolin
2004:
Wrote the screenplay "Million Dollar Baby," based on a book of short stories by longtime fight manager Jerry Boyd; received an Academy Award nomination for best adapted screenplay
2005:
Made feature directing debut with "Crash," a drama featuring an ensemble cast that explores racial tensions in Los Angeles; also produced and co-wrote the screenplay; earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Screenplay and an Oscar nomination for Directing; was also nominated by the Directors Guild of America
2006:
Adapted the screenplay for "The Last Kiss," based on the 2001 film "L' Ultimo Bacio"
2006:
Hired to do a rewrite of "Casino Royale," the 21st installment of the James Bond franchise, starring Daniel Craig
2006:
Wrote the screenplay for "Flags Of Our Fathers," the true story of the six men who raised the flag on Iwo Jima, based on the book by James Bradley; also wrote and produced "Letters From Iwo Jima" the same story told from the Japanese perspective; earned an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screnplay for the "Iwo Jima" drama
2007:
Directed (also wrote) "In the Valley of Elah" starring Tommy Lee Jones as a father searching for his son, a soldier who recently returned from Iraq, but has gone missing
2007:
Created the short-lived NBC drama "The Black Donnellys"
2008:
Contributed to the screenplay of the 22nd James Bond film "Quantum of Solace"
2010:
Co-wrote and directed the thriller "The Next Three Days," starring Russell Crowe and Elizabeth Banks
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Companions close complete companion listing

companion:
Deborah Rennard. Actor. Engaged as of November 1996.

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